College courses – Virginia Marti College http://virginiamarticollege.com/ Mon, 03 Oct 2022 21:01:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://virginiamarticollege.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-3-120x120.png College courses – Virginia Marti College http://virginiamarticollege.com/ 32 32 Fewer college courses for adult learners who get credit from work, life experience https://virginiamarticollege.com/fewer-college-courses-for-adult-learners-who-get-credit-from-work-life-experience/ Mon, 03 Oct 2022 21:01:00 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/fewer-college-courses-for-adult-learners-who-get-credit-from-work-life-experience/ ROANOKE, Va. – This article is part of “Solutions” our ongoing commitment to solutions journalism, spotlighting creative people in communities working to make the world a better place, one solution at a time. Find out what you can do to help SolutionariesNetwork.com. Time and money can be obstacles for adults who want to change careers […]]]>

ROANOKE, Va.This article is part of “Solutions” our ongoing commitment to solutions journalism, spotlighting creative people in communities working to make the world a better place, one solution at a time. Find out what you can do to help SolutionariesNetwork.com.


Time and money can be obstacles for adults who want to change careers or go to college. But at a local community college, they emphasize how students can take fewer classes and still be successful. We work for you on how you can get college credit for your life experience.

“I just wanted to change. I wanted to do something different,” said Latrice Hilton, an adult learner.

But like many people, working full time doesn’t always make it easy. Hilton found the opportunity she needed, breaking into medical coding through Virginia’s G3 program at Virginia Western Community College in Roanoke.

“So this is an opportunity for me, even though I’m working and have other obligations, it opens a door for me to excel in the areas that I want to excel in,” Hilton said.

The G3 program pays for training in five of the most in-demand industries: early childhood education, health care, information technology, public safety and skilled trades.

But Hilton can also get credit for other training – not in class.

“We all know change is scary, very, very scary. And so it’s my job to make sure it’s not that scary. Help them navigate those waters. Figure out if learning that they gained from those work and life experiences could be equivalent to college-level learning so we can get them credit for that,” said VWCC Prior Learning Credit Specialist Cathy Ferguson.

Ferguson examines the skills learned in the field and how that translates into college courses.

“What that means in the long run is that they won’t have to take those introductory courses. This will save them time. It will save them money and they can start the more advanced courses,” Ferguson said. “We don’t just award credit, we award credit for their learning that is equivalent to college-level learning. »

Hilton says having access to programs like these means she can grow.

“It’s an opportunity for me. Even though I’m working and have other obligations, it opens a door for me to excel in the areas I want to excel in and I’m not just going to work because I need a job. But this time I’m going to do something that I really love. The opportunity is there and I’m taking it,” Hilton said.

You can get college credit for things like industry certifications, military and law enforcement training, national standardized exams like CLEP, and even AP exams. Portfolio valuations can also help. This is a self-assessment of learning that you believe is equivalent to college-level learning.

You can learn more about the Prior Learning Credits program and contact information here.

Since last summer, Virginia Western has used G3 funding to provide $1.22 million in aid to 1,336 students. On the manpower side, G3 has so far helped 27 students earn degrees and funded students in CCMA, Pharm Tech, EKG Tech, Phlebotomy, Welding, HEO, Mechatronics Fundamentals and Machining.

At Virginia’s 23 community colleges for the 2021-22 academic year:

  • 11,084 VCCS students received nearly $14.9 million in G3 tuition assistance,

  • 75% (8,272) of G3 students enrolled in credit programs leading to a post-secondary diploma or certificate, while the remaining quarter (2,867) were enrolled in non-credit Workforce Credential Grant (WCG) programs that lead to third-party licensing or certification.

Virginia Community Colleges offering free tuition under the G3 initiative, you can learn more about it by visiting: https://virginiag3.com/


This story is part of a program at WSLS 10, “Solutionaries”. Solutions offer hope and that’s the belief of Solutionaries, a show from our parent company, Graham Media Group, which focuses on those who are tackling some of our greatest challenges. Each episode focuses on effective responses to problems and offers viewers ways to join the effort for positive change.

This month, we are talking about manpower, manpower and what is done to recruit and retain employees. You can watch it starting Wednesday, October 5 at 8 p.m.

We tackle one topic at a time, highlighting the problems many of us face and the solutions that exist. The solution could be in our backyard, or something else that works across the country.

You can check out our story on how Danville fights record violent crime and gang activity here.

You’ll see new Solutionaries episodes every month on WSLS.com and on your streaming device using the 10 News Now app. And we would like you subscribe on youtube!

Copyright 2022 by WSLS 10 – All rights reserved.

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Apprenticeships and college courses are developing for the agricultural sector https://virginiamarticollege.com/apprenticeships-and-college-courses-are-developing-for-the-agricultural-sector/ Sat, 01 Oct 2022 03:03:01 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/apprenticeships-and-college-courses-are-developing-for-the-agricultural-sector/ ABOVE: Front: Dr Stephen Whelan (BSc Program Director in Organic Agriculture, SETU) and Dr Anthony Nolan (BEng Program Director Agricultural Systems Engineering, SETU). Back: Cormac O’Toole (Vice-President for Corporate Affairs, SETU), Dr Frances Hardiman (Head of Faculty of Engineering, SETU), Mr David Denieffe (Vice-President for Academic Affairs, SETU), Minister of State Pippa Hackett , Dr […]]]>

ABOVE: Front: Dr Stephen Whelan (BSc Program Director in Organic Agriculture, SETU) and Dr Anthony Nolan (BEng Program Director Agricultural Systems Engineering, SETU). Back: Cormac O’Toole (Vice-President for Corporate Affairs, SETU), Dr Frances Hardiman (Head of Faculty of Engineering, SETU), Mr David Denieffe (Vice-President for Academic Affairs, SETU), Minister of State Pippa Hackett , Dr John Carroll (BEng Agricultural Systems Engineering Program Director, SETU) and Dr Karen Hennessy (Campus Manager, SETU Wexford)

Education and training opportunities for people who want to work in agriculture are growing, with new apprenticeships and postgraduate courses.

Minister for Further and Higher Education, Research, Innovation and Science, Simon Harris TD, confirmed three new agricultural apprenticeship programs at last week’s Plowing Championship.
The Agricultural Management, Agricultural Technician, and Horticulture apprenticeship programs will accept students in the upcoming academic year.

New courses were also announced at South East Technological University (SETU).
The four new courses are a Level 8 BSc (Hons) and Level 7 BSc in Organic Agriculture and a Level 8 BEng (Hons) and Level 7 BEng in Agricultural Systems Engineering. Applications through the CAO open in November.

Learnings
Speaking at the plowing championships, the minister said: “Until now, legislation prohibited legal apprenticeship in any area of ​​agriculture, horticulture or fishing. Fortunately, that is now changing due to the impending passage of the Higher Education Authority Bill.

“We can now deploy apprenticeships in Agricultural Technician (BTS Level 6) and Operations Manager (BTS Level 7) and in Horticulture (BTS Level 6). Teagasc will begin working with employers to train them in learning management from early 2023 and students will be accepted from September.
“Next month we will be launching Apprenticeship in Sports Turf Management which provides trainees with the skills and knowledge to work in sports turf based businesses such as golf courses, sports fields, local government, farms lawn care and maintenance contractors.”

SETU diplomas
Also announced at the Plowing Championship, South East Technological University (SETU) has expanded its agricultural program offerings with the launch of four new degrees in Organic Agriculture and Farming Systems Engineering.

Speaking at the launch, Dr Stephen Whelan, Program Director, said: “Our new organic agriculture programs offer students a unique opportunity to make a big impact on the organic industry. The BSc in Organic Agriculture is the only such degree offered on the island of Ireland and we believe the Honors version of the course is the only Level 8 degree in Organic Agriculture offered in the UK or Ireland.

The program has been developed in close consultation with industry, including the Irish Organic Association whose expertise has been used in the development of the program’s organic modules.

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Save 50% on a host of Condé Nast College courses! https://virginiamarticollege.com/save-50-on-a-host-of-conde-nast-college-courses/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 12:12:52 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/save-50-on-a-host-of-conde-nast-college-courses/ Calling all Vogue Club members who want to get into fashion! London’s Condé Nast College of Fashion & Design offers a stepping stone to a career in fashion, media and the creative industries – and, as a VC member, you can now save 50% on select Condé Nast College online courses* from October 3, 2022. […]]]>

Calling all Vogue Club members who want to get into fashion! London’s Condé Nast College of Fashion & Design offers a stepping stone to a career in fashion, media and the creative industries – and, as a VC member, you can now save 50% on select Condé Nast College online courses* from October 3, 2022.

Improve your knowledge of fashion branding and communication, or improve your social media strategy with digital content creation – here is a taste of the virtual courses we have selected especially for you…

Brand image and fashion communication

fashion styling

Business and entrepreneurship in the creative industries

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Register here and don’t forget to use code S8NPIC36 at checkout to save 50% off the full course price!

*Discount can be applied to college courses listed above only.

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  1. This offer cannot be combined with any other promotion.
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  3. Discount offer is limited to listed Condé Nast College online Insight courses only.
  4. To claim the 50% discount, use your unique promotional code S8NPIC36 when prompted on the payment site.
  5. Offer valid for courses starting during the 2022/2023 academic year.
  6. Classes are held four times a year. The course dates are: October 3, 2022, January 16, 2023, April 17, 2023, June 26, 2023.
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Kansas outlines plan to offer college tuition to ‘underfunded’ students | Area https://virginiamarticollege.com/kansas-outlines-plan-to-offer-college-tuition-to-underfunded-students-area/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 10:00:00 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/kansas-outlines-plan-to-offer-college-tuition-to-underfunded-students-area/ TOPEKA — Kansas Board of Education member Betty Arnold says a program that gives low-income students nine credit hours of college coursework while in high school can propel more toward two- or four-year degrees — at a condition. Arnold, who represents Wichita, Derby, Mulvane and Haysville, said the $11 million initiative being developed by the […]]]>

TOPEKA — Kansas Board of Education member Betty Arnold says a program that gives low-income students nine credit hours of college coursework while in high school can propel more toward two- or four-year degrees — at a condition.

Arnold, who represents Wichita, Derby, Mulvane and Haysville, said the $11 million initiative being developed by the Kansas Board of Regents could make a real difference if participating high school juniors and seniors understand the opportunities career growth resulting from investments in higher education. Lack of insight into the future, she said, often depletes students’ motivation to take the next step in education.

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Kansas outlines plan offering 9 hours of college tuition to ‘underfunded’ high school students https://virginiamarticollege.com/kansas-outlines-plan-offering-9-hours-of-college-tuition-to-underfunded-high-school-students/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 21:31:51 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/kansas-outlines-plan-offering-9-hours-of-college-tuition-to-underfunded-high-school-students/ TOPEKA — Kansas Board of Education member Betty Arnold believes a program that gives low-income students nine credit hours of college coursework while in high school can propel more toward two- or four-year degrees — at a condition. Arnold, who represents Wichita, Derby, Mulvane and Haysville, said the $11 million initiative being developed by the […]]]>

TOPEKA — Kansas Board of Education member Betty Arnold believes a program that gives low-income students nine credit hours of college coursework while in high school can propel more toward two- or four-year degrees — at a condition.

Arnold, who represents Wichita, Derby, Mulvane and Haysville, said the $11 million initiative being developed by the Kansas Board of Regents could make a real difference if participating high school juniors and seniors are also brought in. understand the career opportunities emerging from investments in higher education. . Lack of insight into the future, she said, often depletes students’ motivation to take the next step in education.

“A lot of students that we’re talking about reaching have no idea ‘Okay, I’m graduating. What do I do after that? A lot can be accomplished if there was a way to.’ educate students about the possibilities,” she said.

The Kansas Board of Regents has notified the State Board of Education of the proposed Kansas First/Diploma Plus plan to provide tuition and tuition grants to community colleges, technical colleges, or colleges. universities to approximately 10,000 underfunded high school students who qualify for free or reduced programs. high school lunch programs.

High school students would be enrolled in six credit hours of basic education courses such as algebra, history, composition, public speaking or sociology. The other three credit hours would be in career-oriented subjects such as biology, business, criminal justice, education, or social work.

Blake Flanders, chairman of the state Board of Regents, said the 2023 Kansas Legislative Assembly could be asked to fund $11 million for tuition and fees for these students, in addition to $1. $9 million to place counselors in high schools to work with students on college readiness. The standard rate to be paid to colleges and universities by the state under the draft proposal would be $113 per credit hour.

“I think this is the year where we really have to break through,” Flanders said. “We know that it’s not necessarily a baccalaureate for everyone. I think that’s something we need. But it’s post-secondary.

Randy Watson, commissioner of the Kansas State Department of Education, said the model could be the successful state-funded program guiding 32,000 high school students into technical education through dual high school enrollment. and in college. This program created under the administration of Governor Sam Brownback has exceeded expectations in terms of student interest.

“How can we do this? How do we meet? said Watson.

Unified advocacy by the State Board of Regents, State Board of Education, higher education institutions involved in delivering courses to high school students could form an influential lobbying coalition in the legislative session beginning in January.

Cindy Lane, a member of the State Board of Regents and former superintendent of public schools in Kansas City, Kansas, said exposing high school students to a college environment would help them develop a personal vision for higher education.

“From my perspective, it’s an opportunity gap,” Lane said. “We hear a lot about gaps in equity. It’s not about the children’s ability to do the job. It’s about not having access to opportunities to connect their dreams to that post-secondary pathway. The big idea here is that we’re going to cultivate talent.

High school students who succeed in the proposed dual enrollment initiative would be more likely to see college as a logical option, said Carter Fine, president of Hutchinson Community College.

It would shorten a student’s time to complete associate’s or bachelor’s degrees in college, he said.

Fine said the state subsidy for tuition and fees would address a major barrier to college enrollment. The current proposal would include sufficient funding for 40% of the 26,000 Kansas juniors and seniors classified as economically underfunded.

People from middle-class families struggled with tuition, he said, but people from lower-income families found it “virtually impossible” to afford a higher education.

The State Board of Regents oversees six public universities as well as community and technical colleges in Kansas. The State Board of Education has jurisdiction over K-12 districts statewide.

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Are online college courses worth it? https://virginiamarticollege.com/are-online-college-courses-worth-it/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 20:19:07 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/are-online-college-courses-worth-it/ You may have decided it’s time to graduate. You’ve considered the traditional approach of taking classes on a college campus, but maybe you don’t have the time or interest in this type of education. You may have heard of taking online courses and wondered: are they worth it? Online college courses allow you to complete […]]]>

You may have decided it’s time to graduate. You’ve considered the traditional approach of taking classes on a college campus, but maybe you don’t have the time or interest in this type of education. You may have heard of taking online courses and wondered: are they worth it?

Online college courses allow you to complete your studies and earn your degree entirely from your computer. You will create your own time to study and have the flexibility to balance life and school.

Here are some essential questions to help you decide if online courses are worth it.

What are the benefits of taking online courses?

Taking online courses has many benefits, and here are some important reasons why online courses can be worth it:

  • Cost. One of the biggest misconceptions about online classes is that they’re just as expensive as going to college in person. By taking online courses, you could save money on additional expenses associated with traditional colleges, such as gas, housing, and meals and dining facilities. Your tuition may also be more reasonable, as some schools, such as Southern New Hampshire University (SNHU), have not raised online tuition in over a decade.
  • Flexibility. Online courses are flexible and versatile and offer the opportunity to earn a degree at your own pace. You can fit your school schedule into your life in whatever way works best for you.

While these are a few benefits that online courses offer, it’s important to remember that every educational experience is unique.

What are some of the most common challenges for students in online courses?

While there are several advantages to taking college courses online, there are also some challenges you should be aware of.

Here are some common challenges for online learners and tips for overcoming them:

Entertainment

While distractions aren’t exclusive to online students, they can still affect them. Distractions can be anything from phone notifications to the lure of the outdoors when you really need to focus on your schoolwork.

One way to overcome distractions is to stick to a schedule and manage your time well. If you need help with possible distractions, schools like SNHU have educational counselors to support your academic success and help you overcome potential obstacles.

Motivation

Without having a physical classroom or a set time to be somewhere, staying motivated to take your classes comes down to discipline. Sometimes events also occur that can make you lose motivation, such as seniority, which impacts students near the end of their program and can cause them to become less consistent with studying and completing assignments.

One way to stay motivated is to remind yourself of your “why”. Why are you going to school? Bringing this “why” to your attention can help rekindle the fire that motivated you to go to school in the first place.

Commitment

One of the hardest parts of learning online can be building relationships with your instructors and classmates. Feeling connected with your peers can seem difficult when you can’t see them face to face all the time.

Some college courses, like those you’ll find at SNHU, provide environments for discussing weekly topics in a collective space. These chats are a great space to introduce yourself to your peers and make those remote connections on a consistent basis.

Understanding and being aware of these challenges and ways to overcome them can set you up for success in the digital classroom.

How to Succeed in the Digital Classroom

If you’re considering online courses, it helps to know what you can expect as an online student. For example, you will be responsible for managing your time. Without the scheduled hours in class to study and get work done, you’ll have to set aside time each week to focus on your studies.

Time management goes hand in hand with organization. Reading your course syllabus as soon as you can access it is a great way to get going and start planning your semester. You’ll be able to identify when big projects are due, so you can be sure to book extra time in advance.

There is no “one size fits all” for maintaining organization and time management. Instead, you can develop a system designed for your preferences. Finding the best system for you may take some experimenting and trial and error, but eventually you will find the best practices to foster personal success.

Is online the right option for you?

Online college courses offer flexibility to fit your life. Considering an online degree program that meets your individual needs can set you up for success. You’ll want to investigate the different fields of study offered and the different degree programs available and find the one that will help you achieve your goals.

Before you fully commit to college, you’ll want to ask yourself some important questions such as:

  • Will I receive a complete and accredited education?
  • Will this school help me achieve my educational and professional goals?
  • What resources and support does this school offer to help me succeed?

Whether you’re just starting out or looking to go back to school, it’s important to consider the type of degree you’re looking for. Degrees include:

Also, if you have already earned college credits, you may be able to transfer those credits to reduce the time it takes to complete your program. If you’re ready to transition to an online degree program, your next step might be to work with an online admissions counselor to get started.

Once you know the college you want has everything you need to succeed, you’re ready to take the plunge with your online education.

A degree can change your life. Find the SNHU online college degree that can best help you achieve your goals.

Nicholas Patterson is a writer at Southern New Hampshire University. Connect with him on LinkedIn.

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New Britain Herald – STUDENT CORNER: Why you should take high school university courses https://virginiamarticollege.com/new-britain-herald-student-corner-why-you-should-take-high-school-university-courses/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 15:50:00 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/new-britain-herald-student-corner-why-you-should-take-high-school-university-courses/ @NewBritHerald In recent years, more and more students have taken AP courses. AP, which stands for Advanced Placement, are college-level courses that introduce students to the type of work they will get in college. Classes can be rigorous and difficult, but you should definitely take them. During my sophomore year of high school, I took […]]]>

@NewBritHerald

In recent years, more and more students have taken AP courses. AP, which stands for Advanced Placement, are college-level courses that introduce students to the type of work they will get in college. Classes can be rigorous and difficult, but you should definitely take them.

During my sophomore year of high school, I took two AP courses, AP US History and AP Biology. Even though the classes were tough and I had to do endless hours of homework, it will be worth it in the end as it can help with college applications and can potentially give me college credit.

In May every year, AP exams are held, which are college-level exams on specific subjects. They test students on their knowledge and what they have learned throughout the school year in the AP course they have taken. If they receive a passing grade of 3, 4, or 5, they can potentially earn college credit, which is extremely helpful as it can save you time and money. Some students earned so many credits that they started college in first year or even second year. They also save money because they won’t have to pay for more courses and credits. Keep in mind that college courses are very expensive, usually thousands of dollars.

Not only can AP classes give you college credit, other classes can as well. For example, New Britain High School offers UConn ECE courses, which can potentially give students college credit at UConn. They can then transfer these credits to the college they will attend. This year I am taking AP English Language, AP Calculus, and AP US Government and Politics. AP English Language is also an ECE class, so I will have a better chance of receiving college credit. In order to earn UConn ECE credits, you must meet UConn’s class passing requirements. For example, if I meet the requirements for the UConn ECE English course I am taking, I can earn four college credits, which will help me tremendously in the future.

All in all, students should definitely take college courses in high school as it will save them time and money in their future.

Celine Chreiha is a junior from New Britain High School who has a passion for writing

Posted in New Britain Herald, New Britain on Wednesday September 14th, 2022 11:50 AM. Updated: Wednesday September 14, 2022 11:52.

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10 state inmates enrolled in college classes with federal grant | 406 Politics https://virginiamarticollege.com/10-state-inmates-enrolled-in-college-classes-with-federal-grant-406-politics/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 19:50:00 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/10-state-inmates-enrolled-in-college-classes-with-federal-grant-406-politics/ Last month, ten inmates at Montana State Prison began college classes with Helena College under the Second Chance Pell Grant program that officials hope can help reduce recidivism. The federal program is administered by the Montana Department of Corrections and the Montana University System. Pell grants are generally available to needy students, although previously they […]]]>

Last month, ten inmates at Montana State Prison began college classes with Helena College under the Second Chance Pell Grant program that officials hope can help reduce recidivism.

The federal program is administered by the Montana Department of Corrections and the Montana University System.

Pell grants are generally available to needy students, although previously they were not available to students in prison. The US Department of Education announced in April an expansion of the Second Chance program, which is now in its third round of grant installments. Among the 73 additional colleges and universities that will offer college courses for students in prisons are Great Falls College, Montana State University Billings, Dawson Community College and Helena College.

People also read…

The 10 inmates who received the grants began work Aug. 29 toward an Applied Science Certificate in Automotive Technology through Helena College, the state Department of Corrections said in a statement Monday. hurry.

“I believe this will be a critical part of my success,” said Ty Jensen, an inmate who recently took a welding course at the prison and hopes to own a fabrication and body shop. “It will help me gain the skills and the ability to have a career and stay out and never come back.

Helena College Dean Sandra Bauman said in the press release that students will be connected to the classroom experience through smart boards and other technologies while gaining hands-on experience through Montana Correctional Enterprises, the prison work and training.

“It provides the right education to enter the automotive industry, but it also provides an opportunity for anyone who wants to further their education and earn an associate’s degree,” Bauman said. “From there, the sky is the limit. This is a university system program, so there are (a) lot of transferable courses. Students can continue to build on this education as they wish.”

Both corrections and education officials hailed the program’s opportunities in Monday’s news release.

“This is a great opportunity for people under our supervision to further their education and improve their skills so they can have more job opportunities when they leave our facilities,” said DOC Director, Brian Gootkin. “We are excited to help these offenders fill the employment gaps in Montana with the skills they are gaining through training with Montana Correctional Enterprises and now with additional skills from our college partners.”

“Higher education is a proven pathway to reduce recidivism, improve post-release employment opportunities, and provide the skills and training necessary for successful reintegration,” said Montana Higher Education Commissioner Clayton Christian. “Providing high-quality educational opportunities to students from all backgrounds is at the heart of everything we do in the Montana university system. I am pleased that our colleges and universities are joining with the Department of Corrections to improve outcomes for individuals and communities. »






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Choose university or college courses? 5 Questions Students Should Ask https://virginiamarticollege.com/choose-university-or-college-courses-5-questions-students-should-ask/ Wed, 07 Sep 2022 18:13:22 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/choose-university-or-college-courses-5-questions-students-should-ask/ The sudden shift from on-campus teaching to distance learning in March 2020 changed the way university and college professors taught courses. While some professors reverted to old ways after returning to campus, others sought new approaches. The result is a mix of different types of courses offered to university and college students. It’s no longer […]]]>

The sudden shift from on-campus teaching to distance learning in March 2020 changed the way university and college professors taught courses.

While some professors reverted to old ways after returning to campus, others sought new approaches. The result is a mix of different types of courses offered to university and college students.

It’s no longer just about whether a course fits a student’s schedule and schedule. Students should ask additional questions. Yet times are changing rapidly and information can quickly become outdated.

1. How long does the course require?

The online pivot has encouraged some professors to add or remove course material. As a result, the time students spend on a course can vary significantly from teacher to teacher. This can especially be a problem for students who have heavy course loads while balancing other professional and personal responsibilities.

Aside from internships and field courses, most universities and colleges have few standards for how much time students should spend outside of the classroom.

Ask, how much reading is needed? Are there heavy writing requirements in online articles and discussions? A course with weekly assignments is easier to manage than a course with only one major assignment due at the end. Course advisors may have copies of lesson plans or an instructor’s lesson plan may be available online.

Although students should not take only “easy” courses, it is important to manage the workload well. Stress contributes to students’ mental health problems. It’s good to be challenged, but don’t take too much of it.

Get a good idea of ​​how long a course will take and how you can meet its requirements among other commitment issues.
(Shutterstock)

2. Do I have to take courses? Can I work remotely?

Many students now combine online and face-to-face classes in their programs.

The difference between online courses and face-to-face courses has blurred. Many face-to-face courses now have significant online components. If instructors record classes, provide comprehensive course materials, and allow assignments or tests to be submitted online, the class grading structure can allow for face-to-face class attendance and infrequent attendance.

This can benefit students juggling family or work commitments with college or university.

But be aware of how lectures can affect your grades, experience, and learning. Teachers work hard in the classroom to engage and inspire. Lectures can be entertaining, interesting and can open up new learning opportunities. The body language of teachers communicates additional information. They can edit parts of a recorded lecture that they deem too spontaneous to keep.

Whether or not learning outcomes depend on peer collaboration, many students find it motivating to be around their peers. At the same time, the creation of learning communities can also take place in online environments.

It’s also easy to spend more time than expected replaying recorded lectures.

Students seen seated in a classroom.
Some professors have become more understanding and sympathetic to student needs during the chaos of COVID-19.
(Shutterstock)

3. Is the teacher accessible and flexible?

Some professors have become more understanding and sympathetic to student needs during the chaos of COVID-19. Others less. Professors are generally required to describe how students can reach them, including the preferred method of communication and the response time of the email or online system in the program. This will also describe any flexibility built into their course.

Students often share their experiences with different courses and instructors with each other, which can be helpful. Keep in mind, however, that these experiences may have changed during the pandemic.

Another way to get information is to ask the professor directly. Their response (or lack thereof) can be helpful. Just respect the work-life boundaries that most professors have established regarding digital communication outside of normal working hours, as they also juggle their commitments to increasing workloads, while trying to mitigate burnout during the pandemic.

4. Will I need special equipment and materials?

It became clear during the pandemic that some students were struggling with internet connections, underpowered devices, and equitable access.

Operating systems can be a problem when installing specialized software (such as the ArcGISPro GIS software used in our geography field). Campus computer labs are typically set up for specific software, but it’s worth investigating how responsive computer support is for students using their own devices.

Students should also ensure that they will be able to access textbooks. Anecdotally, we’ve seen situations where copyright constraints affect how international students can access digital textbooks, or deliveries are delayed or blocked by customs.

5. Does the grading system show my abilities?

Many teachers have had to rethink traditional notation. Some are now more flexible with deadlines and formats.

Some professors offer the possibility for students to resubmit. Open book exams have become more common during COVID-19.



Read more: How the COVID-19 pandemic may have changed college teaching and testing for good


Find out: How many quizzes and exams are included in a course? What type of questions are on a test? How are the tests administered and scored? What are the assignments? Do the grading rubrics clearly indicate how the instructor will grade the assignments?

And ask yourself why you are taking the course? Does homework help you learn or just prove that you already know something? What matters most to you for this particular course?

Different teachers teach differently. If you’re a student with choices in a program, it makes sense to know what you’re getting.

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26 Rock ‘n’ Roll College Courses https://virginiamarticollege.com/26-rock-n-roll-college-courses/ Mon, 29 Aug 2022 16:58:17 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/26-rock-n-roll-college-courses/ School is back in session. A new year of education begins as the younger ones pack their backpacks with freshly sharpened pencils and the older ones move into the dorms. You might not associate rock ‘n’ roll with academia, especially because rock artists are often assumed to be college dropouts. Of course, this is not […]]]>

School is back in session. A new year of education begins as the younger ones pack their backpacks with freshly sharpened pencils and the older ones move into the dorms.

You might not associate rock ‘n’ roll with academia, especially because rock artists are often assumed to be college dropouts. Of course, this is not always the case. Some note that the classroom experience rarely compares to real life. “If you want to get fucked, go to college; if you want to get an education, go to the library,” Frank Zappa once said. Leonard Cohen described his time as a graduate student at Columbia University as “passion without flesh, love without climax”.

At the very least, all of this proves that you don’t have to have a degree or formal education to become a rock star. The Beatles never learned to read sheet music, Jimmy Page learned to play guitar mostly by listening to records, and Mick Jagger didn’t take a single singing lesson until he was over 50.

As the decades passed and the history of rock ‘n’ roll began to be examined more closely, several artists became the subjects of college lectures. As their catalogs and contributions to music and pop culture have grown in prominence, it’s worth studying how they got to where they ended up.

We take a look at 26 Rock ‘n’ Roll College Courses below. The lesson will now begin.

26 Rock ‘n’ Roll College Courses

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