College courses – Virginia Marti College http://virginiamarticollege.com/ Mon, 02 May 2022 13:00:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://virginiamarticollege.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-3-120x120.png College courses – Virginia Marti College http://virginiamarticollege.com/ 32 32 Digital Ready and Outlier.org Partner to Offer Early College Math Courses to Increase Access to Jobs in Boston’s Growing Innovation Economy https://virginiamarticollege.com/digital-ready-and-outlier-org-partner-to-offer-early-college-math-courses-to-increase-access-to-jobs-in-bostons-growing-innovation-economy/ Mon, 02 May 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/digital-ready-and-outlier-org-partner-to-offer-early-college-math-courses-to-increase-access-to-jobs-in-bostons-growing-innovation-economy/ BOSTON, May 2, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Digital Ready and Outlier.org today announced a partnership offering three free-for-credit college math courses to high school students in Boston Public schools starting fall 2022. Thanks to this partnership, Boston high school students can follow Outlier.org College algebra, Bakingand Calculation I courses at no cost to them and earn […]]]>

BOSTON, May 2, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Digital Ready and Outlier.org today announced a partnership offering three free-for-credit college math courses to high school students in Boston Public schools starting fall 2022.

Thanks to this partnership, Boston high school students can follow Outlier.org College algebra, Bakingand Calculation I courses at no cost to them and earn up to 9 college credits from the University of Pittsburgh, helping to make college more accessible and affordable. Too often, calculus serves as a roadblock that prevents students from pursuing a STEM career. This partnership will ensure that Boston students have a solid foundation in mathematics to ensure they are prepared for the rigor and demands of STEM careers related to computer science, engineering, architecture, biotechnology, data science data, etc

In the first year, the partnership will prioritize students who are grossly underrepresented in from boston the innovation economy, including women, black and Latino students, as well as students attending a Boston high school that ranks in the lowest 10% of schools in the state. Registration for fall semester courses will open today. Classes will begin online in September with in-person support available throughout the semester. Interested students can register for the course at DigitalReady website. Boston students entering grades 10, 11 and 12 this fall are eligible.

This collaborative partnership will amplify the opportunities for from boston high school students, providing them with the access, resources and support needed to enter from boston booming technology economy. “Increasing access to rigorous math courses in high school must be our priority in Boston or we risk isolating our students from the economic and civic fabric of their home community. We have a city rich in resources and employment opportunities, but inequitable in its distribution. This partnership is just one example of how we can partner to break down barriers for our Black and Latino students and ensure they have access to well-paying jobs in Boston that put them and their families on the path to economic mobility,” says Dr. Sarah rice with cherriesthe executive director of Digital Ready.

Created with a mission to expand access to high-quality education and reduce student debt, Outlier.org builds bridges to higher education, one carefully designed course at a time. Founded by Aaron Rasmussen (co-founder of MasterClass), Outlier.org was named one of the TIME Magazine’s Best Inventions of 2020. By combining cinematic video, thoughtful pedagogy, student support and technology, Outlier.org creates the best online versions of general education college courses.

“We designed Outlier.org to be both engaging and educationally comprehensive,” said Aaron Rasmussen, CEO and Founder of Outlier.org. “Outlier.org’s math courses can help chart a path for underrepresented and low-income minority students in STEM fields. We’re excited to continue to build on this programming as we partner with Digital Ready to further expand access to STEM education.”

Digital Ready is a Boston-a mission-based organization to activate the creative potential of high school students, especially underrepresented youth—students from low-income backgrounds and students of color—with the agency, social capital, and skills to build their own pathways to economic mobility and success in from boston innovation economy. For more information, visit www.digitalready.org or follow @digitalreadyboston on Instagram.

Created by the co-founder of MasterClass, Outlier.org offers beautiful, effective online courses that earn students transferable college credit for a fraction of the cost. In addition to featuring cinematic-quality lectures, Outlier.org courses are taught by some of the most charismatic personalities in academia, including instructors from Yale, MITand Colombiaand are transcribed by the University of Pittsburgh, one of the top 60 schools. Students benefit from a premium learning experience that includes access to one-on-one tutoring for math lessons, AI-monitored assessments, dynamically generated problem sets, and active learning materials from point. In line with the company’s mission to increase access to quality higher education and reduce student debt, each course is offered at only $400. For more information about Outlier.org, follow them on instagram, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedInand Youtube.

SOURCEOutlier.org

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Indiana’s Largest Institution of Higher Education Offers Free College Tuition | State https://virginiamarticollege.com/indianas-largest-institution-of-higher-education-offers-free-college-tuition-state/ Wed, 27 Apr 2022 16:05:00 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/indianas-largest-institution-of-higher-education-offers-free-college-tuition-state/ (The Center Square) — Ivy Tech Community College will host a pair of programs offering free college tuition to any high school student in Indiana this summer. At least 3,000 Hoosier high school students are expected to enroll. The Crossing the Finish Line program is funded by federal relief funds as part of the Governor’s […]]]>

(The Center Square) — Ivy Tech Community College will host a pair of programs offering free college tuition to any high school student in Indiana this summer. At least 3,000 Hoosier high school students are expected to enroll.

The Crossing the Finish Line program is funded by federal relief funds as part of the Governor’s Education Emergency Relief Fund. Additional access to free summer programming for high school students will be paid for by Ivy Tech.

Both programs include free tuition, technology, course fees, and books. The average student will save up to $575 per course.

Crossing the Finish Line was created in 2021 in partnership with the Indiana Department of Education and the Indiana Commission for Higher Education, according to Rebecca Rahschulte, vice president of K-14 initiatives and partnerships. statewide at Ivy Tech.

The goal was to help high school students who were about to graduate from post-secondary education earn their final credits. About 1,800 students have enrolled and more than 800 have obtained their diploma or certificate.

This year, a similar program will be added, open to all high school students in the state. The goal is to counter the declining trend of high school graduates pursuing higher education by broadening exposure to academic and professional opportunities, officials said.

In 2019, 59% of Indiana high school graduates went on to some form of higher education. This rate was down from 61% in 2018. The rate has steadily declined since peaking at 65% in 2015.

Raschulte hopes that these programs will counter this trend.

“Ivy Tech wants to remove barriers that prevent students from accessing college programs,” she said.

Ivy Tech is Indiana’s largest institution of higher education. The college received $313 million from state and local governments and $264 million in federal grants, contracts, and appropriations in 2021.

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Indiana’s Largest Institution of Higher Education Offers Free College Tuition | Indiana https://virginiamarticollege.com/indianas-largest-institution-of-higher-education-offers-free-college-tuition-indiana/ Wed, 27 Apr 2022 16:05:00 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/indianas-largest-institution-of-higher-education-offers-free-college-tuition-indiana/ (The Center Square) — Ivy Tech Community College will host a pair of programs offering free college tuition to any high school student in Indiana this summer. At least 3,000 Hoosier high school students are expected to enroll. The Crossing the Finish Line program is funded by federal relief funds as part of the Governor’s […]]]>

(The Center Square) — Ivy Tech Community College will host a pair of programs offering free college tuition to any high school student in Indiana this summer. At least 3,000 Hoosier high school students are expected to enroll.

The Crossing the Finish Line program is funded by federal relief funds as part of the Governor’s Education Emergency Relief Fund. Additional access to free summer programming for high school students will be paid for by Ivy Tech.

Both programs include free tuition, technology, course fees, and books. The average student will save up to $575 per course.

Crossing the Finish Line was created in 2021 in partnership with the Indiana Department of Education and the Indiana Commission for Higher Education, according to Rebecca Rahschulte, vice president of K-14 initiatives and partnerships. statewide at Ivy Tech.

The goal was to help high school students who were about to graduate from post-secondary education earn their final credits. About 1,800 students have enrolled and more than 800 have obtained their diploma or certificate.

This year, a similar program will be added, open to all high school students in the state. The goal is to counter the declining trend of high school graduates pursuing higher education by broadening exposure to academic and professional opportunities, officials said.

In 2019, 59% of Indiana high school graduates went on to some form of higher education. This rate was down from 61% in 2018. The rate has steadily declined since peaking at 65% in 2015.

Raschulte hopes that these programs will counter this trend.

“Ivy Tech wants to remove barriers that prevent students from accessing college programs,” she said.

Ivy Tech is Indiana’s largest institution of higher learning. The college received $313 million from state and local governments and $264 million in federal grants, contracts, and appropriations in 2021.

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NC announces $34 million grant program to fund summer college classes https://virginiamarticollege.com/nc-announces-34-million-grant-program-to-fund-summer-college-classes/ Tue, 26 Apr 2022 18:25:33 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/nc-announces-34-million-grant-program-to-fund-summer-college-classes/ On April 22, Governor Roy Cooper earmarked $34 million in new federal funding to further help post-secondary students graduate or graduate and to help meet the learning and mental health needs of students in K-12 as students continue to recover from the pandemic. The governor is investing $27 million in the creation of the Summer […]]]>

On April 22, Governor Roy Cooper earmarked $34 million in new federal funding to further help post-secondary students graduate or graduate and to help meet the learning and mental health needs of students in K-12 as students continue to recover from the pandemic.

The governor is investing $27 million in the creation of the Summer Accelerator grant program. The program will provide tuition assistance to public and private post-secondary students taking summer courses to accelerate or stay on track toward graduation.

“Many of the jobs of today and tomorrow require a degree or diploma beyond high school,” Governor Cooper said. “This funding will help students who have lost ground during the pandemic get back on track to graduating and support K-12 students who need mental health support.”

The Summer Accelerator Grant Program will award grants of up to $5,000 to cover tuition, fees, books, housing, and other expenses based on the number of summer courses a student takes. To be eligible for a Summer Accelerator grant, a student must be a resident of North Carolina for tuition purposes, be enrolled in a college degree program or post-secondary credential, and be working toward their first post-secondary degree or credential. Funds will be available for students taking classes during the summer of 2022 and 2023. Students interested in the program should contact their college financial aid office.

Funding for the Summer Accelerator program will be provided in the form of grants to the UNC system, the NC Community College System (NCCCS), and independent colleges participating in state grants on a needs basis through the State Education Assistance Authority (NC SEAA). The UNC system receives just over $16.3 million in funding, and the NCCCS and independent colleges (via NC SEAA) each receive just over $5.3 million in funding.

“For community college students balancing work, family, and college, Summer Accelerator scholarships are a lifeline to shorten their time to graduate and enter the workforce,” said Thomas Stith, president of NC Community. College System. “These grants are critical, especially at a time when our 58 large community colleges across the state help fuel the job engine and growth of North Carolina’s economy.”

“The UNC system has set strong goals for on-time graduation,” said UNC system president Peter Hans. “Now more than ever, students need our help to stay on track and cross the finish line, and the summer school is a key opportunity for them to do so. We are grateful to the Governor for his support of student success.

“NCICU and our 36 independent colleges and universities deeply appreciate this innovative support for North Carolina students,” said Hope Williams, president of NC Independent Colleges and Universities. “These funds will allow students to catch up and accelerate their progress towards their university degree as they recover from the challenges created by the pandemic.”

Governor Cooper first proposed a more robust version of the Summer Accelerator program in his American Rescue Plan Act budget recommendations using state fiscal stimulus funds. This is now the Governor’s latest initiative to ensure higher education remains affordable and develop a skilled workforce.

In addition to the Summer Accelerator grant program, the package also includes the following investments:

$5 million to the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services to expand Mental Health Youth First Aid (MHFA) training. PSSM Youth Training teaches adults who work with young people, including teachers and school staff, how to identify and support young people aged 12-18 who are experiencing mental health and addiction issues and how to help in crisis situations. The funds will be used to certify new Youth PSSM Instructors statewide and provide in-person or virtual Youth PSSM training to public and non-public school staff and other community members involved in the lives of youth. This follows Governor Cooper’s investment of $40 million in GEER funds in August 2020 in K-12 public schools to help schools meet the physical and mental health needs of students during the pandemic. .

“We know that the COVID-19 pandemic has increased mental health and addiction issues for many North Carolina residents,” said Kody H. Kinsley, secretary of the Carolina Department of Health and Human Services. North. “Recovering stronger from this pandemic together means prioritizing the behavioral health and well-being of our children and families. We are grateful for this investment in both areas that supports early intervention programs that will make a critical difference in the lives of many adolescents.

$1.7 million to the NC Business Committee for Education (NCBCE) to expand the Technical team initiative. Tech Team is a student technology support program where students receive training in resolving information technology (IT) support issues and earn employer-recognized IT certifications. Students then complete a computer support internship through their school district, providing computer support and repair services to students and teachers. Currently, 10 school districts operate Tech Team pilots. At least 263 students have participated in computer training through the pilot projects, including 68 students as computer interns in their school district.

$726,000 at North Carolina Education Corps (NCEC) to help accelerate learning recovery for public school students through high-impact literacy tutoring provided one-on-one or in small groups by “body members”. The funding will be used to reimburse the NCEC for expenses incurred to recruit, train and place tutors in North Carolina public schools since July 1, 2021 and to plan for the possible expansion of math tutoring during the school year. 2022-2023. The NCEC, which now operates as an independent nonprofit, was launched in fall 2020 as a new partnership between the North Carolina State Board of Education, the governor’s office, local school districts, and the NC Commission. on Volunteerism and Community Service. In August 2020, the Governor allocated $20 million in GEER funding to public schools to meet the educational needs of at-risk students and students with disabilities. Many school districts use these funds to hire NCEC corps members to support literacy tutoring for K-3 students.

Funding for these initiatives comes from federal Emergency Assistance for Non-Public Schools (EANS) funds that have been directed to the Governor’s Education Emergency Assistance Fund (GEER).

The Summer Accelerator grant program is the Governor’s latest initiative to ensure higher education remains affordable and develop a skilled workforce. In May 2021, the Governor launched the Longleaf Commitment Community College Grant Program which ensures that recent high school graduates from low-to-middle income families will receive at least $2,800 in federal and state grants to cover college tuition fees. tuition and most fees at one of the state institutions. 58 community colleges. The Commitment program complements the Federal Pell Grant and existing aid by providing an additional grant of $700 to $2,800 per year. An expansion of the Longleaf Commitment program has received bipartisan support through the state budget, supporting the high school class of 2022. To date, more than 13,600 students have received a Longleaf Commitment grant with more than 8 $.6 million to support students across the state. Sixty-three percent of scholarships went to students with household incomes below $70,000.

Photo by Melissa Schaub, Sandhills Sentinel photographer.

Contributed.

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North Carolina Announces $34 Million Grant Program to Fund College Summer Schools | State https://virginiamarticollege.com/north-carolina-announces-34-million-grant-program-to-fund-college-summer-schools-state/ Mon, 25 Apr 2022 19:02:00 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/north-carolina-announces-34-million-grant-program-to-fund-college-summer-schools-state/ (The Center Square) – North Carolina is offering $34 million in college summer school grants and funding for K-12 programs that address learning loss and needs in mental health. Governor Roy Cooper last week announced $34 million in new federal funding that North Carolina officials are allocating to a range of educational programs to help […]]]>

(The Center Square) – North Carolina is offering $34 million in college summer school grants and funding for K-12 programs that address learning loss and needs in mental health.

Governor Roy Cooper last week announced $34 million in new federal funding that North Carolina officials are allocating to a range of educational programs to help students continue to recover from the pandemic.

The governor has earmarked the largest sum — $27 million — to create a Summer Accelerator grant program that will provide tuition assistance to students taking summer classes to accelerate or stay on track. towards graduation.

The program will provide grants of up to $5,000 to cover tuition, fees, books, housing, and other expenses based on the number of summer courses students attend. The scholarships are open to North Carolina residents working towards their first college degree or credential and will be available for the summers of 2022 and 2023.

“Many of the jobs of today and tomorrow require a degree or diploma beyond high school,” Cooper said. “This funding will help students who have lost ground during the pandemic get back on track to graduating and support K-12 students who need mental health support.”

The Summer Accelerator program will provide grants to the UNC system, the NC Community College system, and independent colleges participating in state need-based grants through the State Education Assistance Authority. The UNC system will receive $16.3 million in funding, while the other entities will each receive just over $5.3 million.

“For community college students balancing work, family, and college, Summer Accelerator scholarships provide a lifeline to shorten their time to graduate and enter the workforce,” said Thomas Stith, president of NC Community. College System. “These grants are critical, especially at a time when our 58 large community colleges across the state help fuel the job engine and growth of North Carolina’s economy.”

Other aspects of the funding envelope include $5 million to the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services to expand youth mental health first aid training. The training teaches adults who work with young people, such as teachers and school staff, how to identify and support young people between the ages of 12 and 18 who are experiencing mental health and addiction issues and how to help in crisis situations. .

“We know that the COVID-19 pandemic has increased mental health and addiction issues for many North Carolina residents,” said DHHS Secretary Kody Kinsley. “Recovering stronger from this pandemic together means prioritizing the behavioral health and well-being of our children and families. We are grateful for this investment in both areas that supports early intervention programs that will make a critical difference in the lives of many adolescents.

Another $1.7 million will go to the North Carolina Business Committee for Education to expand the Tech Team initiative, a student technology assistance program that provides students with information technology training to earn recognized certifications. by employers.

The North Carolina Education Corps (NCEC) will also receive $726,000 to help accelerate the learning resumption of public school students through one-on-one or small-group literacy tutoring by corps members.

“The funding will be used to reimburse the NCEC for expenses incurred to recruit, train and place tutors in North Carolina public schools since July 1, 2021 and to plan for the possible expansion of math tutoring during the school year. 2022-23,” according to a press release from Cooper.

The NCEC was established in the fall of 2020 as an independent, nonprofit partnership between the North Carolina Board of Education, the governor, local schools, and the State Commission on Volunteerism and Community Service.

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North Carolina Announces $34 Million Grant Program to Fund College Summer Schools | North Carolina https://virginiamarticollege.com/north-carolina-announces-34-million-grant-program-to-fund-college-summer-schools-north-carolina/ Mon, 25 Apr 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/north-carolina-announces-34-million-grant-program-to-fund-college-summer-schools-north-carolina/ (The Center Square) – North Carolina is offering $34 million in college summer school grants and funding for K-12 programs that address learning loss and needs in mental health. Governor Roy Cooper last week announced $34 million in new federal funding that North Carolina officials are allocating to a range of educational programs to help […]]]>

(The Center Square) – North Carolina is offering $34 million in college summer school grants and funding for K-12 programs that address learning loss and needs in mental health.

Governor Roy Cooper last week announced $34 million in new federal funding that North Carolina officials are allocating to a range of educational programs to help students continue to recover from the pandemic.

The governor has earmarked the largest sum — $27 million — to create a Summer Accelerator grant program that will provide tuition assistance to students taking summer classes to accelerate or stay on track. towards graduation.

The program will provide grants of up to $5,000 to cover tuition, fees, books, housing, and other expenses based on the number of summer courses students attend. The scholarships are open to North Carolina residents working towards their first college degree or credential and will be available for the summers of 2022 and 2023.

“Many of the jobs of today and tomorrow require a degree or diploma beyond high school,” Cooper said. “This funding will help students who have lost ground during the pandemic get back on track to graduating and support K-12 students who need mental health support.”

The Summer Accelerator program will provide grants to the UNC system, the NC Community College system, and independent colleges participating in state need-based grants through the State Education Assistance Authority. The UNC system will receive $16.3 million in funding, while the other entities will each receive just over $5.3 million.

“For community college students balancing work, family, and college, Summer Accelerator scholarships provide a lifeline to shorten their time to graduate and enter the workforce,” said Thomas Stith, president of NC Community. College System. “These grants are critical, especially at a time when our 58 large community colleges across the state help fuel the job engine and growth of North Carolina’s economy.”

Other aspects of the funding envelope include $5 million to the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services to expand youth mental health first aid training. The training teaches adults who work with young people, such as teachers and school staff, how to identify and support young people between the ages of 12 and 18 who are experiencing mental health and addiction issues and how to help in crisis situations. .

“We know that the COVID-19 pandemic has increased mental health and addiction issues for many North Carolina residents,” said DHHS Secretary Kody Kinsley. “Recovering stronger from this pandemic together means prioritizing the behavioral health and well-being of our children and families. We are grateful for this investment in both areas that supports early intervention programs that will make a critical difference in the lives of many adolescents.

Another $1.7 million will go to the North Carolina Business Committee for Education to expand the Tech Team initiative, a student technology assistance program that provides students with information technology training to earn recognized certifications. by employers.

The North Carolina Education Corps (NCEC) will also receive $726,000 to help accelerate the learning resumption of public school students through one-on-one or small-group literacy tutoring by corps members.

“The funding will be used to reimburse the NCEC for expenses incurred to recruit, train and place tutors in North Carolina public schools since July 1, 2021 and to plan for the possible expansion of math tutoring during the school year. 2022-23,” according to a press release from Cooper.

The NCEC was established in the fall of 2020 as an independent, nonprofit partnership between the North Carolina Board of Education, the governor, local schools, and the State Commission on Volunteerism and Community Service.

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Amazon offers free college courses for employees https://virginiamarticollege.com/amazon-offers-free-college-courses-for-employees/ Thu, 14 Apr 2022 14:15:00 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/amazon-offers-free-college-courses-for-employees/ Finding time to pursue higher education is getting easier for Amazon employees. E-commerce giant partners with college education platform Outlier.org to offer its 750,000 hourly employees access to a library of college courses, available for free. Class time can be transferred for college credit at universities, including the University of Pittsburgh. “We want to meet […]]]>

Finding time to pursue higher education is getting easier for Amazon employees.

E-commerce giant partners with college education platform Outlier.org to offer its 750,000 hourly employees access to a library of college courses, available for free. Class time can be transferred for college credit at universities, including the University of Pittsburgh.

“We want to meet learners where they are, no matter where they are in their educational journey or career path,” says Tammy Thieman, global program manager for Amazon’s Career Choice program. “We are very committed to ensuring that our employees get a good return on their investment of time for education.”

Read more: Employers may need to go back to school to recruit talent

Employees can register for 18 courses offered on the Outlier.org platform. Learning modules start every two weeks, making scheduling accessible. Removing these common barriers helps steer more employees toward a career and learning path that’s right for them, Thieman says.

“We have people coming in after they’ve finished high school and haven’t gone any further, or maybe got a few college credits before entering the workforce,” she says. “So we have redoubled our efforts to meet people where they are and help them take the next step. And it looks different for everyone.

Employees are increasingly eager for opportunities to expand their knowledge outside of the office. Nearly 70% of workers would change jobs if they received free job training, according to research from Amazon and Gallup.

Read more: Free college? This company makes it a reality

However, there is still a significant gap between interest and engagement. While 80% of employees are interested in going to school while working, only 20% know if their employer offers an education benefit, according to a survey by employee education platform InStride. For those in the know, only 2% participate in the perks available.

Promoting the importance of higher education and ensuring employees participate is central to a continuing education initiative for Amazon, says Thieman. Company plans to invest nearly $1.2 billion in higher education programs by 2025, including tuition reimbursement, diploma and GED programs, and ESL certifications . Fifty thousand employees have already taken part in Career Choices offers.

Read more: Employee training is the key to preventing costly skills shortages

With the big quit giving workers the ability to find employers who are fully invested in their success, education benefits can set an employer apart, Thieman says. The long-term impact for employees and employers is enormous.

“Our employees have told us that career success is important,” she says. “They care about improving skills. They care about skill development and career progression. Helping people take the next step in their career will continue to be important as we move forward.

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Soon, students will be able to take 2 college courses together | Latest India News https://virginiamarticollege.com/soon-students-will-be-able-to-take-2-college-courses-together-latest-india-news/ Tue, 12 Apr 2022 18:13:58 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/soon-students-will-be-able-to-take-2-college-courses-together-latest-india-news/ College students will be allowed to take two university courses at the same time as long as both are of the same level of advancement, the University Grants Commission (UGC) announced on Tuesday in a decision that represents a significant reform of the education system. superior. Once notified, students can take two undergraduate, postgraduate or […]]]>

College students will be allowed to take two university courses at the same time as long as both are of the same level of advancement, the University Grants Commission (UGC) announced on Tuesday in a decision that represents a significant reform of the education system. superior.

Once notified, students can take two undergraduate, postgraduate or diploma courses at the same time as long as the courses do not collide or if one or both are taught online. The option will not be available if it is a medical or engineering course.

UGC President, Mr Jagadesh Kumar, said the move is in line with the National Education Policy (NEP) 2020, which supports multidisciplinary education in all fields including science, social science, arts, humanities and sports. “NEP 2020 recommends providing as much flexibility as possible for students to personalize and personalize their education so that they can receive a multidisciplinary and holistic education across disciplines. So, if students want to pursue two degrees simultaneously, they will now have an option. It all depends on the choice of the students,” Kumar said.

Kumar said the provision will be applicable to non-technical courses affiliated with UGC.

The UGC plans to implement the reform this year. “These guidelines are effective from the date of notification by UGC. No retroactive benefit can be claimed by students who have already earned two degrees simultaneously prior to notification of these guidelines,” said the draft guidelines, a copy of which was reviewed by HT.

However, experts and academics have raised concerns about the announcement, warning that the provision could reduce the focus of education to the mere pursuit of degrees or dilute the value of the programs themselves.

Abha Dev Habib, Associate Professor of Physics at Miranda House College, University of Delhi (DU), said: “UGC by issuing such guidelines will dilute its full-time degrees and their value. For holistic growth, classroom time should be balanced with time for self-study, group study, extracurricular activities, summer projects, etc. Education is a social activity and students learn through interactions. You have to plan time for that. It’s one thing to allow students to earn degrees with extra credit, but allowing students to pursue two “full-time” degrees will be disastrous.

According to the draft guidelines, students can pursue two full-time degrees in three ways. First, they can take both academic programs in person provided that class times do not overlap. Second, they can take one program in person and another online or remotely. And third, they can take up to two programs online or remotely.

“The two universities or colleges should be close to each other. It is not possible to take two programs in person at two universities located in different cities,” the UGC president said, illustrating some of the conditions under which this will be allowed. Students can, he added, pursue a second program at the same college or university.

The UGC has also warned that under this provision, online programs will only be permitted by tertiary institutions recognized by the commission or the Indian government.

Kumar clarified that it will not be mandatory for universities to adopt these guidelines. “Once the guidelines are published, universities can devise mechanisms through their statutory bodies to allow students to take two university programs simultaneously. This will not be a mandatory requirement. But we hope that more and more universities and colleges will allow students to pursue two degrees together,” he said.

Admission to both courses will be through existing processes followed by the respective higher education institution, Kumar said.

Students will not be allowed to use credits earned in one program to meet the requirements of another program, the UGC president added.

Asked about the possibility of overlapping examinations, Kumar, “It will be up to the institutes to decide. If two institutions have a memorandum of understanding and have decided to let each other’s students pursue two degrees simultaneously, then they can easily schedule the exams. »

Rajesh Jha, Professor of Political Science at DU’s Rajdhani College, said: “This will reduce the purpose of education to obtaining degrees rather than acquiring knowledge. How will it be possible for students to fulfill the requirements of two full-time degrees simultaneously? It is not humanly possible. »


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Careers in Agriculture: College Courses to Consider https://virginiamarticollege.com/careers-in-agriculture-college-courses-to-consider/ Sat, 02 Apr 2022 23:07:00 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/careers-in-agriculture-college-courses-to-consider/ In this article, FRS takes a look at choosing the right agricultural career path. Agriculture continues to play an important role in the Irish economy. However, the landscape of agriculture is changing, and so is the education that surrounds it. Choosing a career can be a difficult task for many people. As Leaving Certificate approaches, […]]]>

In this article, FRS takes a look at choosing the right agricultural career path.

Agriculture continues to play an important role in the Irish economy. However, the landscape of agriculture is changing, and so is the education that surrounds it.

Choosing a career can be a difficult task for many people. As Leaving Certificate approaches, Year Six students across Ireland will begin to consider many different types of courses, work placements and jobs.

For those looking to make a move into the agricultural or horticultural industry, there are many options available.

Agricultural careers

With traditional agriculture, self-employment or work on a family farm is common. However, there are several other career paths related to agriculture that you might consider.

Some of them include agroscience research, wildlife and tourism, agribusiness, engineering, and conferences.

With so many courses available to students, it can be difficult to navigate through the options. Below is a breakdown of some available options that could help students find the right course or path to take.

QQI course

Firstly, for those who do not wish to take a third level course, there are a number of QQI courses you could consider.

These cover a variety of services and content, including agriculture, food science, animal management, and forestry.

Those interested in finding out more can visit www.fetchcourses.ie or www.teagasc.ie.

If you want to get into farming, the Green Cert is a good option to consider.

The Green Cert is a full-time course (September to May) and lasts two years. It is a mix of classroom learning and on-farm/workplace learning.

You can complete the in Teagasc Colleges; Ballyhaise, Clonakilty and Kildalton. Alternatively, you can complete it at private colleges Gurteen, Pallaskenry and Mountbellew.

The above colleges offer Level 5 and Level 6 courses and collaborate with other third level institutions to offer higher level courses.

Also, you can complete the Green Cert through distance learning colleges and through a part-time course for over 23s only.

To find out more about The Green Cert, contact the college/Teagasc through their website, as all applications are online.

Level 7/8 ag courses

For those wishing to take level 7 or 8 courses, there are a number of colleges, institutes and universities across Ireland offering courses.

There is a wide variety of choices in UCD, WIT and many more. Examples of courses include ‘Sustainable Agricultural Management and Agribusiness’ (Level 8) at Wexford, ‘Agricultural Engineering’ (Level 7) at Kerry and ‘Horticulture’ (Level 7) at Waterford.

All courses will run from September to May and depending on the course content you may be required to complete practical work experience. You can find a list of courses at www.cao.ie with information on each.

Informed decisions

Also, choosing the right place to study can be a difficult task. We recommend going to the open days. Visiting and taking a tour will give you the opportunity to ask questions to help you decide.

If you can’t get there, visit their website or search their social media to learn more about classes.

Hands-on farm experience

If you want to gain hands-on experience on the farm, why not consider becoming an FRS operator?

Visit www.farmrelief.ie/careers and complete an online application form, or you can also call 1890 790 890 for more information.

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Honors College courses are too competitive for students https://virginiamarticollege.com/honors-college-courses-are-too-competitive-for-students/ Thu, 31 Mar 2022 20:06:27 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/honors-college-courses-are-too-competitive-for-students/ The Honors College provides its business card to a series of incoming students, outlining the actual requirements needed to graduate from the program. (Photo by L Hoffman) Students take pride in their accomplishments, including being accepted into the prestigious UW Honors College. However, what is the advantage of this position if it means that students […]]]>
The Honors College provides its business card to a series of incoming students, outlining the actual requirements needed to graduate from the program. (Photo by L Hoffman)

Students take pride in their accomplishments, including being accepted into the prestigious UW Honors College. However, what is the advantage of this position if it means that students cannot enroll in the courses they need to graduate?

Recently, the Honors College introduced a non-Western attribute course requirement for graduation for honors students which has not been evenly distributed.

Like any other policy change at the university, students who were already enrolled in the college or transferred prior to the introduction were exempted from this course requirement.

This creates a cost disparity between honor students, especially those who may have only transferred a semester apart but with the same academic results, as newly indoctrinated students must pay for an additional course in view of graduation.

Although early registration is an advantage for being an honors student, a distinction must be made between them and advisors must provide senior and junior status individuals with meetings and registrations first.

Not only is the requirement for this course typology unevenly distributed among honor college students, but there is also a dire lack of it.

The Honors College offers only three to five non-Western assigned courses each semester, with an average of about sixteen places per class. Although waiting-listing or emailing the professor for an “exception” is an option, not all students are successful in enrolling.

One of my colleagues even described that he had to postpone his honors college graduation for three semesters because he was unable to enroll in a non-Western assigned course due to the competitiveness of the classes.

The Honors College is expected to increase class availability slots to up to twenty.

Even numbers promote more successful group discussions and projects, and if a professor needs help with grading, the Honors College could employ a new internship or teaching assistant program.

Alternatively, a specialist course teacher once said that after learning about her unique background and how it fits into the specialist college’s mission to teach “interdisciplinary courses” in “an invigorating and highly effective learning environment he was “begged” to teach.

Most critical is the expansion of class options, particularly non-Western assigned courses, through the dual appointment of faculty from multiple colleges on campus and the reassessment of qualifications needed to create unique classes for honors students.

While I myself, as an honors student, was lucky enough to secure a place with a non-Western assigned course for my graduation requirements, the same cannot be said for courses that elicit my interest.

For three semesters, I tried to enroll in a course that would help me adapt my argumentative skills to my future career as a lawyer. My first attempt was unsuccessful because the class was full and I hadn’t made enough connections on campus to make an argument as to why I should be an exception to the class.

The following semester, I was misled by an advisor who believed the course would still be offered. When I found out the course was unavailable, I couldn’t have been more dismayed.

Knowing the difficulty of registering for the specialization classes, I secured both early registration and an early meeting with a counselor to receive my PERC number in hopes of entering the class.

Yet despite my best efforts – despite my preparation – the fall semester course was full and, once again, I was forced into another class.

Honors College courses are too competitive, even for their own limited student population, and a solution must be found.

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