College students – Virginia Marti College http://virginiamarticollege.com/ Thu, 06 Oct 2022 18:45:39 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://virginiamarticollege.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-3-120x120.png College students – Virginia Marti College http://virginiamarticollege.com/ 32 32 Lawsuit could mean North Carolina College students get refunds for Covid year https://virginiamarticollege.com/lawsuit-could-mean-north-carolina-college-students-get-refunds-for-covid-year/ Thu, 06 Oct 2022 18:45:39 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/lawsuit-could-mean-north-carolina-college-students-get-refunds-for-covid-year/ CAMBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS – MARCH 12: Students leave dormitories at Harvard Yard on the campus of Harvard University on March 12, 2020 in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Students have been asked to leave their dorms by March 15 due to the risk of coronavirus (COVID-19). All classes will go live for the remainder of the spring semester. Students […]]]>

CAMBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS – MARCH 12: Students leave dormitories at Harvard Yard on the campus of Harvard University on March 12, 2020 in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Students have been asked to leave their dorms by March 15 due to the risk of coronavirus (COVID-19). All classes will go live for the remainder of the spring semester.

Students definitely had the end of the stick in 2020 and 2021. Important milestones were missed, including sports seasons, proms, and the overall in-person learning experience. And college kids were no exception. Students across the country have been forced out of dorms and attend all their classes online. Yet their tuition fees remained the same. Many feel they should be refunded because they didn’t have the full experience they were charged for. And some North Carolina students are suing over it WCNC reports. Do you think students should receive refunds for classes that have been moved to remote learning due to COVID?

The lawsuit that was filed against the UNC Board of Governors will go to a state appeals court. The lawsuit claims that when students were forced off North Carolina college campuses, it was a “breach of contract.” Although not allowed on campus, students still had to pay fees for health services, parking, security, and other benefits that they could only enjoy if the campus was open.

Similar cases were brought against different universities across the country and were won by students. I have to side with the plaintiffs in this situation, students should be reimbursed for expenses they were unable to enjoy during the covid year.

Source

North Carolina College one of the 10 hardest to get into in the country

We have fantastic universities in North Carolina. there is no doubt. But when I saw Niche’s latest ranking of the hardest schools to admit, I never expected to find an NC school ranked so high. But it’s true, a college in North Carolina is one of the hardest to get into in the entire country. It’s ranked just between Columbia and Brown, which isn’t a bad company to include. This list is compiled by Niche and is based on acceptance rates and SAT/ACT test scores using data from the US Department of Education. The top 25 includes schools with acceptance rates between 5-12%. And while there has been an overall de-emphasis on SAT/ACT scores, you’re still looking at scores in the 1400s or 1500s if you want to attend one of the most elite schools in the country.

Of course, the universities you would expect are on this list, including Ivy League schools. And the first place should surprise no one. But I’ll be honest, there were several schools on this list that I had never heard of before. Although to have such rigorous admission standards, many people must have. Most of the hardest colleges to get into are in the Northeast, with some in California as well. While it’s not a school I could ever get into, or a sports team I find myself cheering on without 2 games a year, it’s still something to be proud of that a college in Carolina North is one of the most difficult to integrate in the country.

Which one is it then? Below is the top 25 list, but I’ll let you know it’s close to the top. You can read the full Niche ranking here.

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Separation from Parents: 4 Ways to Cope for Students https://virginiamarticollege.com/separation-from-parents-4-ways-to-cope-for-students/ Tue, 04 Oct 2022 17:48:01 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/separation-from-parents-4-ways-to-cope-for-students/ Leaving parents and home to live in a totally new place with strangers or just another city is not easy for anyone. Even teenagers who supposedly (or really) hate living with their parents and can’t wait to move are not stress-proof. Plus, when you’re moving to attend college, there’s a whole host of new tasks […]]]>

Leaving parents and home to live in a totally new place with strangers or just another city is not easy for anyone. Even teenagers who supposedly (or really) hate living with their parents and can’t wait to move are not stress-proof.

Plus, when you’re moving to attend college, there’s a whole host of new tasks to do. The stress is overwhelming and it can be hard to focus on anything other than your thoughts or your desire to get home. Most of the time, students have to face a new reality where they have to control a lot more things than before. Thus, knowing the coping mechanisms is crucial, and in this article, we will share the most effective ones!

Photo by sofatutor on Unsplash

Don’t try to tear off the bandage

Starting to ignore your parents after moving to a separate dorm or apartment is not an effective way to show your independence. It will probably only add to your stress. The same goes for trying to fully immerse yourself in college life from the earliest days. Walking a fine line is important at this stage so that you gradually adapt to life without your parents and to the new surroundings. So, make new acquaintances and develop new habits, but don’t immediately abandon old ones.

For example, you can still ask your mom or dad for help with homework, just like you used to. Of course, at university you will have a lot more tasks to manage than usual, so sometimes it will be more efficient to search nursing essay help from EssayHub instead of calling your parents and discussing the problem.

Still, if you’re just lacking inspiration or ideas, you can always call them, explain the problem and ask for help with homework, just like the good old days. Even if you grew up to be able to live apart from them, they will always be happy to help you.

Respect the traditions you had when you lived in the same house. Whether it’s lunch together on Saturday or going to the movies every weekend, stick to this routine, at least at first. Even if you are away from home, you can make a call online and watch a movie together. Such things will help make the transition smooth and less stressful.

Photo by MChe Lee on Unsplash

Photo by MChe Lee on Unsplash

Spend quality time with your parents

When you visit them (which may be a rare case), try not to always sit at home or eat out. Take part in outdoor activities or play board games, whichever suits you. Create new memories.

Make sure you free up enough time to visit your loved ones and spend time with them. You may need to look for a medical school personal statement writing service As trial service to find a reliable expert who will take care of some of your assignments while you are away. Still, it’s worth your money. Instead of being in a hurry and thinking about all kinds of tasks, you can enjoy your free time.

Set a schedule or get a planner

When you have a lot to do, one of the first things that probably pops into your mind are memories from your childhood. Most things used to be taken care of by your parents, but now it’s your job. Even if your parents prepare you for an independent life, in practice, there are many things to stumble upon.

In order to keep track of all chores and tasks, consider:

  • get a planner
  • creating a schedule
  • use calendar notifications

It may seem boring at first, but in the end, you won’t have to keep your every responsibility in mind.

Socialize

Finally, it is not only a question of staying in contact with one’s parents but also of blending into the new environment. Sticking to the past never works. And this is the hardest thing you will have to face: living at home with your parents on an ongoing basis is no longer the reality.

It is therefore essential to discover new things, to exchange with peers, to participate in team projects, etc. These days, all of this is possible for even the stiffest introverts thanks to online communication. And for the rest, there are other advantages like parties and student trips. So make sure you don’t miss your chance!

Summary

There is nothing wrong with longing for your parents and your home, even if you have long dreamed of changing your life and environment and making new friends. For some students this process seems natural, but others may be so afraid of change that they begin to try to return to their roots, abandoning their goals and development. The tips we have shared in this article will work for these people. So if you are one of them, be sure to try some of the recommendations!

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Homeless students could get guaranteed income in Santa Clara County https://virginiamarticollege.com/homeless-students-could-get-guaranteed-income-in-santa-clara-county/ Fri, 30 Sep 2022 05:46:08 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/homeless-students-could-get-guaranteed-income-in-santa-clara-county/ Santa Clara County considers guaranteed income for homeless students heading to college Santa Clara County says it will begin reviewing a guaranteed income program for homeless teens heading to college. The program will be funded by the county and will help approximately 2,500 homeless students across the county. SAN JOSE, CA. – Santa Clara County […]]]>

Santa Clara County says it will begin reviewing a guaranteed income program for homeless teens heading to college. The program will be funded by the county and will help approximately 2,500 homeless students across the county.

State Senator David Cortese, told KTVU that after reading the Silicon Valley Pain Index, he had to take action. He partnered with the Board of Supervisors to develop a plan that would address housing insecurity among students in the county.

“Having a housing crisis like that really hampered my ability to work in school,” said Saline Chandler, a student at San Jose State University.

Saline Chandler is a former foster kid who was homeless in high school and while attending San Jose State University. Her lack of housing led her to join the San Jose State Student Homeless Alliance to ask the University to help struggling students.

“I was living at the Bill Wilson Shelter and just couchsurfing, sleeping in my car, and it went on for almost three years until my name finally appeared on a housing listing for the county and I got a apartment,” Chandler said.

Chandler is not alone. The 2022 Silicon Valley Pain Index, an annual report highlighting inequality, says 11.2% of students in San Jose State have been homeless in the past 12 months. In 2020, data shows that 53,000 students across the Cal State University system were homeless at some point that year.

“You can’t fight homelessness at the adult level, as you continue to graduate, literally push young people into homelessness at the same time. It’s just a treadmill that we have to get out of,” said Sen. David Cortese, CA-Dist. 15.

Cortese, who sponsored SB 1341 in which the county modeled the program after, says the program will cost about $750,000 to $1 million a year. Each unhoused student will receive an unconditional stipend of $1,000 for five months after graduating from high school. He says the stipend gives homeless students a much-needed boost to start college.

“A lot of people don’t realize that 25% of the homeless population in Santa Clara County alone is under the age of 25. That’s truly a staggering number and half of that, or 12-12½%, a under the age of 18. What did they do to deserve this?” said Cortese.

Cortese says this type of program has already been successful with foster youth coming out of the system. As for Chandler, she is in her senior year at San Jose State and works with Destination Home, advocating for the homeless. The Supervisory Board will review the framework for the program in November.

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Should Students Follow the Money? https://virginiamarticollege.com/should-students-follow-the-money/ Sun, 25 Sep 2022 12:30:00 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/should-students-follow-the-money/ President Biden’s recent student loan forgiveness program has sparked heated debate, based largely on the assumption that Americans should judge a student’s college degree and major by one criterion: how much money will the graduate earn and what will be the return on investment? In a typical criticismAllysia Finley, of the wall street journal editorial […]]]>

President Biden’s recent student loan forgiveness program has sparked heated debate, based largely on the assumption that Americans should judge a student’s college degree and major by one criterion: how much money will the graduate earn and what will be the return on investment?

In a typical criticismAllysia Finley, of the wall street journal editorial board, concludes that Biden’s plan will support a “bureaucratic-educational complex [that] has produced too many young people with too much debt and too few skills that employers want. Florida Governor Ron DeSantis (right) is even more blunt, decrying Biden’s plan to subsidize degrees in what he deems unnecessary, such as gender and “zombie studies.”

This narrow focus on the economic value of majors and degrees goes back many years. In 2014, for example, President Obama said that “people can do a lot more, potentially, with skilled crafting or crafts than they could with an art history degree.

Although Obama later apologized to art history students, his comments reflect what has become a self-perpetuating paradigm that dominates public perception of the purpose and value of higher education. . Again and again and again, civil servants, commentatorsand the media focus on return on investment (ROI), narrowly defined, in discussions of whether college is worth it and incentivize students to pursue studies in business, computer science, and STEM.

Students with a humanities and arts degree earn on average less than those with a STEM or business degree. They are also more likely to regret their choice of major and finds no more meaning in their work, perceptions without a doubt partly shaped by current conventional wisdom. But today’s emphasis on the financial rewards of different tracks masks wide variations in outcomes and wrongly values ​​higher education solely for its contribution to career earnings.

While a typical major in history or journalism could expect income for life $3.4 million compared to the $4.6 million a typical economics or chemistry major might anticipate, “a lot of highest-paying humanities majors earn more than the lowest paying STEM majors. Also, where you study can be as important as what you study. The return on investment of liberal arts colleges “is comparable to return on investment in major engineering and technology schools and business and management schools.

And for most people, enough is as good as a feast. College graduates, regardless of major, on average earn more, to live longer, pay more taxes, give more to charity, use less government assistanceand contribute more to their communities than those without a degree. It is therefore not surprising that nearly 90% of people with a degree in the humanities say they are satisfied with their life, a percentage that places them almost on par with STEM and commerce majors.

Regardless, students tend to do better in the subjects that interest them, both in school and afterwards. So even if the only measure is lifetime income, it doesn’t make sense to tell people whose interests, abilities, and high school readiness predispose them to majoring in the arts or humanities to go on to college. engineering or computer science.

And, unlike criticism of the humanities and the arts, which, it should be noted, is often grounded in partisan politics, few, if any, make derogatory remarks. comparisons between the majors in computer science or engineering and business or biology simply because starting salaries are on average much higher for the former than for the latter.

More importantly, an exclusive focus on monetary rewards ignores the larger purpose and nonmonetary benefits of higher education. A good liberal arts education inspires lifelong interests and encourages critical thinking, aesthetic appreciation, and intellectual curiosity. It helps people learn to work with others, appreciate different perspectives, and fully engage in their communities. It can lead tobetter decisions on health, marriage, and parenting,” and making people “more patient, more goal-oriented, and less likely to engage in risky behaviors.” A liberal arts education can also strengthen civic literacy, improve text analysis and oral and written communication skills, and foster knowledge of foreign languages ​​and cultures.

Additionally, society needs graduates educated in the humanities and arts as well as STEM and business. We would have far fewer teachers, artists, social workers, journalists, and other valuable yet undervalued professionals if students only pursued studies in the highest-paying fields.

Students were not always so concerned about the economic return on their investment. In 1976, a little less half of freshmen said they made more money as “a very important reason to go to university”. In 2019, this number had increased to 73%, and it has probably increased since. Of course, the cost of attendance has skyrocketed since 1976, so colleges and universities bear some of the blame for that change.

The impact of the unique financial critique of liberal arts degrees is clear. Depending on what is included under the heading of the humanities, the number of graduates has decreased from 16% to 29% since 2012, with only one in 10 students graduating in the humanities in 2020. In fields such as history, art, philosophy and foreign languages, the number of majors has dropped by 50% since the early 2000s.

Historically, the number of students majoring in the humanities and arts disciplines tend to fluctuate with the economy, declining during tough times and bouncing back in a growing economy. Recent years, however, have seen a steady shift from the humanities and arts to fields like engineering, healthcare, and business.

“Follow the money” may be good advice when pursuing political corruption, but if taken as a guide for higher education, we will all be poorer for it.

David Wippman is the president of Hamilton College.

Glenn C. Altschuler is the Thomas and Dorothy Litwin Professor of American Studies at Cornell University. He is the co-author (with Isaac Kramnick) of “Cornell: A History, 1940-2015.”

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Helping Students Sort Out Big Changes in Election Laws https://virginiamarticollege.com/helping-students-sort-out-big-changes-in-election-laws/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 14:18:00 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/helping-students-sort-out-big-changes-in-election-laws/ In several states, including Missouri, it will be harder for college students to vote this year. State legislatures that have passed new voter ID laws banning the use of college ID cards have created a significant barrier for young people. While I usually advocate letting young adults figure out how to carry out their adult […]]]>

In several states, including Missouri, it will be harder for college students to vote this year. State legislatures that have passed new voter ID laws banning the use of college ID cards have created a significant barrier for young people.

While I usually advocate letting young adults figure out how to carry out their adult responsibilities on their own, like voting, this year may require some parental guidance to help them fulfill their civic duty. At the very least, parents should start reviewing the rules now and talking to their young adult children about a voting plan, especially for students attending college out of state.

Four years ago I was shocked to learn how difficult it is for many students to vote. During the last midterm election season, I was teaching a writing class to freshmen at Washington University in St. Louis.

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I knew that for most of them it would be their first opportunity to vote in a national election. I also knew that establishing a voting pattern early on helps cement a lifelong voting habit. So I challenged my class: let’s set a goal to achieve 100% voter turnout in our class.

I encouraged them to check online if they were registered and to find out what the procedure was for voting by mail if they planned to vote in another state. I periodically checked in with the class to ask how their voting plans were going. Students shared challenges with requested mail-in ballots not arriving for several weeks and not knowing how far in advance they would need to mail them back to ensure they would be counted.

One parent had to physically go to an election committee, pick up an absentee ballot, and send it via FedEx to their child to ensure they arrived in time to be sent back to California. At the time, I was surprised that a parent would go this far, but now that I find myself in a similar situation, I am also prepared to take extraordinary measures to protect my child’s right to vote.

My daughter attends college in Texas, but she resides in Missouri and registered to vote here. To vote by mail, she would have to fill out a form requesting a mail-in ballot and note the reason she was voting by mail. Since mailing to university addresses may not be reliable, she should request that the ballot be sent to our home address. I would then send him the ballot. I should probably include postage. She would fill out and sign the ballot, which would then have to be signed on the envelope in front of a notary before being mailed back. A notary !

There are many points at which this system could fail, particularly if mail is delayed at one of the four points where it needs to be sent.

His other option would be to register to vote in Texas. Texas, like Missouri, no longer allows the use of university-issued ID (which verifies each student’s identity before it is issued) to vote. So she should find a way to get a new Texas-issued ID. She doesn’t have a car and lives on campus, so she can’t get a Texas driver’s license. If she simply obtained a Texas-issued ID (not a license), it would invalidate her Missouri driver’s license, which she must drive while at home. Also, she does not have her original birth certificate or social security card with her.

I spent two whole days trying to find the easiest way for her to vote in November. I even checked how much it would cost to bring her back to town during the absentee voting window. That would be around $500 – way out of my budget.

It seems his best option will be to register to vote in Texas. I sent him the address of the County Board of Elections and told him to take an Uber. I plan to see her before November, to give her her passport, which she can use to vote in the state without losing her Missouri driver’s license.

It shouldn’t be that hard for an American citizen to exercise their basic right to vote.

Given that youth voting reached an all-time high in the 2020 election and their support for President Joe Biden was a deciding factor in key races across the country, I can see why Republican-controlled legislatures would want to remove their votes.

As I told my students, there’s a reason the elected officials make it so hard for you to make your voice heard.

Don’t let them stop you.

For more on voter registration, changes to the law, and celebrating the right to vote, check out Dance the Vote between 12:30 p.m. and 3 p.m. on September 24 at the Missouri History Museum.

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Voting Opens for Harvard College Students on Fall Referendum Papers HUA | New https://virginiamarticollege.com/voting-opens-for-harvard-college-students-on-fall-referendum-papers-hua-new/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/voting-opens-for-harvard-college-students-on-fall-referendum-papers-hua-new/ College students will answer a number of questions posed by the Harvard Undergraduate Association this week — ranging from expanding hot breakfast options to a College-wide vacation on Election Day. HUA solicited student input on seven questions in an email Tuesday morning. Three of the seven questions relate to changes to the bylaws and constitution […]]]>

College students will answer a number of questions posed by the Harvard Undergraduate Association this week — ranging from expanding hot breakfast options to a College-wide vacation on Election Day.

HUA solicited student input on seven questions in an email Tuesday morning. Three of the seven questions relate to changes to the bylaws and constitution of the newly formed association.

The proposed changes include a clause that would allow the Association’s executive board to update the list of Harvard offices with which each officer’s team works — a power it currently lacks. Another change would see the Association’s governing documents updated to reflect their current financial guidelines.

In an optional question, the Association also sought student feedback on changes it has already made to its governing documents to comply with the school’s Title IX regulations.

Under the Association’s current constitution, constitutional changes can only be ratified by a two-thirds majority vote in a school-wide referendum. Amendments to the statutes only require a simple majority.

The referendum also asks students if they would support expanding hot breakfast options in each of Harvard’s upperclass living quarters. Currently, hot breakfast is only served at Annenberg Hall and Quincy House.

The ballot also gauges student support for a College-recognized “Democracy Day” to be held on federal election day.

HUA’s predecessor, the Undergraduate Council, was supposed to issue a similar referendum question last semester, but the initiative was scrapped on the eleventh hour after a lengthy debate between representatives from UC and the Harvard Votes Challenge. Some HVC leaders argued that the results of the vote would be influenced by a controversial issue appearing alongside – whether to disband the UC altogether.

Although the HUA referendum question does not explicitly include the word “holiday”, HUA Co-Chair LyLena D. Estabine ’24 wrote in a message to The Crimson that the HUA is working with the Harvard Votes Challenge to advocate for a suspension of classes on Election Day.

Voting will close Wednesday evening at 9 p.m.

—Editor J. Sellers Hill can be contacted at sellers.hill@thecrimson.com. Follow him on Twitter @SellersHill.

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United World College students reunite with their families away from home | Local News https://virginiamarticollege.com/united-world-college-students-reunite-with-their-families-away-from-home-local-news/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 05:45:00 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/united-world-college-students-reunite-with-their-families-away-from-home-local-news/ Country the United States of AmericaUS Virgin IslandsU.S. Minor Outlying IslandsCanadaMexico, United Mexican StatesBahamas, Commonwealth ofCuba, Republic ofDominican RepublicHaiti, Republic ofJamaicaAfghanistanAlbania, People’s Socialist Republic ofAlgeria, People’s Democratic Republic ofAmerican SamoaAndorra, Principality ofAngola, Republic ofAnguillaAntarctica (the territory south of 60 degrees S)Antigua and BarbudaArgentina, Argentine RepublicArmeniaArubaAustralia, Commonwealth ofAustria, Republic ofAzerbaijan, Republic ofBahrain, Kingdom ofBangladesh, People’s Republic […]]]>

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Abraham Baldwin College of Agriculture students celebrate National Agriculture Education Day | https://virginiamarticollege.com/abraham-baldwin-college-of-agriculture-students-celebrate-national-agriculture-education-day/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 13:33:00 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/abraham-baldwin-college-of-agriculture-students-celebrate-national-agriculture-education-day/ TIFTON — National Agriculture Education Day was September 15, and students at Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College had good reason to celebrate. For the fourth consecutive year at the Spring Quarter Commencement Ceremony, when 34 agricultural education graduates walked across the stage, ABAC produced more graduates with bachelor’s degrees in agricultural education than any other college […]]]>

TIFTON — National Agriculture Education Day was September 15, and students at Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College had good reason to celebrate.

For the fourth consecutive year at the Spring Quarter Commencement Ceremony, when 34 agricultural education graduates walked across the stage, ABAC produced more graduates with bachelor’s degrees in agricultural education than any other college or university east of the Mississippi River.

“These graduates will contribute to the severe national shortage of agricultural education teachers that has existed for more than 40 years,” said Andrew Thoron, head of the Department of Agricultural Education and Communication at ABAC.

ABAC currently has more than 230 agricultural education majors enrolled for the fall 2022 semester. Forty of those students will be teaching in classrooms across the country this spring.

“Being an agriculture teacher is a life-changing career choice,” said Ellen Poeschl, director of the National Association of Agricultural Educators. “Agriculture teachers have the opportunity to make a difference every day, by mentoring and inspiring young people.

“The demand for agriculture teachers remains strong and National Agriculture Education Day is critical to NAAE’s mission to ensure a diverse and quality supply of agriculture teachers. ABAC’s Ag Ed program is a great example of creating a pool of extraordinary agricultural teachers who will have an impact on the communities they serve.

To prepare students for the classroom, ABAC faculty work diligently to instill effective pedagogy, technical knowledge, and leadership skills. Graduates are prepared to teach agricultural education courses in middle school and high school.

In 2021, an Elementary Agricultural Education Teacher Program was established at ABAC, the first of its kind in America. ABAC has also partnered with Murray State University to encourage graduates to continue their education in a master’s degree program.

With its honors program in the School of Agriculture and Natural Resources, ABAC is in a unique position to offer students of agricultural education coursework in selected areas such as animal science, horticulture and agricultural mechanics. .

Thoron said agricultural education graduates find a fairly receptive labor market for their skills.

“While our goal is to get students into the agriculture teaching profession, students and industry employers find this degree meets many needs,” Thoron said. “We develop students who are grounded in agricultural content knowledge and possess the teaching and people skills that make them a valuable leader and model employee across the industry. »

Prospective students who would like more information about the Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Education at ABAC can contact the ABAC Admissions Office at admissions@abac.edu. Spring semester classes begin at ABAC on January 9.

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Community college students without cars face transportation challenges, especially as the Orange Line closes https://virginiamarticollege.com/community-college-students-without-cars-face-transportation-challenges-especially-as-the-orange-line-closes/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 19:48:14 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/community-college-students-without-cars-face-transportation-challenges-especially-as-the-orange-line-closes/ The MBTA Orange Line stops at both Boston Community College campuses in Roxbury and Charlestown, so the September train line shutdown was a blow to student commuters like Kiara Rosario. “I don’t have a car. I need this transportation,” she said, standing in the heat at a temporary shuttle bus stop on Columbus Avenue at […]]]>

The MBTA Orange Line stops at both Boston Community College campuses in Roxbury and Charlestown, so the September train line shutdown was a blow to student commuters like Kiara Rosario.

“I don’t have a car. I need this transportation,” she said, standing in the heat at a temporary shuttle bus stop on Columbus Avenue at Roxbury Community College on a recent September morning.

The 34-year-old single mother is studying to become a social worker, while working part-time in a grocery store and raising a five-year-old disabled child. Waiting for a shuttle that has an empty seat added about half an hour to her journey and strained her ability to get where she needs to go in time, but without a car she has no other choice .

Transportation is an issue for many community college students. According to research, 20% of New England community and technical college campuses are not easily accessible by public transportation at all.

The Seldin/Haring-Smith Foundation in Washington, D.C. mapped the presence and proximity of transit stops to community colleges across the United States by state and region, and the results showed that some community colleges in Massachusetts don’t even have a local bus service.

“It depends on where you go to college,” chief executive Abigail Seldin said. “Until the Orange Line shutdown, many students who lived and worked along the Orange Line did not need a car to get to college. When you get away from this transit system, however, it is more variable.

Mount Wachusett Community College’s Fitchburg campus and Shawsheen Valley School of Nursing in Billerica are two of the most inaccessible campuses in Massachusetts, she said. The foundation assessed the 116 campuses belonging to the New England community and technical colleges, including 15 community colleges in Massachusettsto determine proximity to public transportation.

Eight campuses in Massachusetts are within five miles of a public transit line, but are not connected by public transit.

“In some cases, improvements would require the extension of an existing bus line; other schools would only need a slight route adjustment of a bus route to provide close access,” the report said. “In some situations, where the only means of transportation nearby is a train station, a shuttle service could eliminate owning a car as a barrier to completing a program. The distance between the public transport stop and the school poses a particular challenge for students and staff with disabilities, as well as those who manage strollers. »

The community college system is often a lifeline, helping hard-working and immigrant students earn an associate’s degree and higher-paying jobs or jump into a four-year college program. Nearly a third of all college students in the United States attend community college, and nearly all of them have to commute, according to the Department of Education. But the report notes that community college students who drive to school are often “just a flat tire away from dropping out.”

Seldin/Haring-Smith Foundation Community and Technical College Transit Map:

The MBTA said it does not track the number of Massachusetts community college students out of the 130,000 who use the T statewide or the Orange Line in Boston.

But the MBTA’s deep-seated issues — from major line reconstruction to the two fires that delayed the Green Line over the weekend — highlight the students’ dilemma and add a financial burden.

According to the College Councilcommunity college students spend an average of $2,000 on public transportation per year.

“For context, a full Pell Grant is $6,000 a year, and most of that is taken up by tuition at many schools, even many community and technical colleges,” Seldin said.

The foundation is using its findings to encourage federal grants that will help students cover their transportation costs and encourage schools without public transit to connect to public bus routes.

Local transit officials in Massachusetts don’t have to look far to find a good example of how to do this.

In Rhode Island100 percent of the state’s six community colleges have a transit stop within walking distance.

After Rhode Island expanded its free community college program in 2017, Scott Avedisian, chief executive of the Rhode Island Public Transit Authority, said the state has made access to public transit a priority.

“We got everyone together and said, ‘Look at the number of students we serve. How can we better serve them? “, he recalls.

The Rhode Island Transit Authority has estimated that it serves nearly 400,000 students per year. With a federal grant, the state is also creating another bus hub on the Warwick Community College campus, providing students with express service to the University of Rhode Island in Kingston.

“If we can show them that there’s an easy way to go from community college to a full four-year college in the same system, then we’re opening up a whole new world for a whole bunch of students who don’t wouldn’t have gone to any higher education institution,” Avedisian said.

Back at the Roxbury Community College shuttle stop in Boston, Rosario said she typically spends about $90 a month on public transportation.

“It’s over $1,000 [each year]”, said Rosario, “but less than car insurance. “

So far this semester, she said, the temporary Orange Line shuttles are running a little late and are often full.

“We only use one door in the shuttle and everyone has to be seated,” Rosario said.

And if all the places are occupied, it moves on to the next shuttle.

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Johnson County Community College Updates: Students Can Take JCCC Credits With Them to Other Schools | Shawnee Mission Post https://virginiamarticollege.com/johnson-county-community-college-updates-students-can-take-jccc-credits-with-them-to-other-schools-shawnee-mission-post/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 15:01:24 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/johnson-county-community-college-updates-students-can-take-jccc-credits-with-them-to-other-schools-shawnee-mission-post/ The JCCC has transfer agreements with over 60 local and regional four-year colleges and universities. Students can get a head start on their bachelor’s degree at JCCC for a fraction of the cost and then take those class credits with them to a four-year school. Although a student’s education begins here, it doesn’t have to […]]]>

The JCCC has transfer agreements with over 60 local and regional four-year colleges and universities. Students can get a head start on their bachelor’s degree at JCCC for a fraction of the cost and then take those class credits with them to a four-year school. Although a student’s education begins here, it doesn’t have to end here!

Helpful Transfer Tips

Transferring credits involves careful planning and takes time. Following a few best practices makes it easy for students to start the process.

Prepare in advance

Students should think about transferring their credits early, even during their first semester at the JCCC. Students should think about where they want to go and identify what is important to them, including location, degrees offered, and cost.

It’s also not a bad idea to think about the living conditions and how they might want to be socially and academically involved in the school they eventually want to attend. All of these ideas can help inform a student’s transfer plan.

Help is available

After determining where they want to go, students should meet with a JCCC academic advisor to explore the transfer credit process. The JCCC Student Success Center and our online platform transfer guides also help students understand how to manage transferred credits.

Research is important

Before developing a transfer plan, students should understand the difference between transferring to public/private schools and in-state/out-of-state schools. It is also important for students to know the specific transfer policies and admission and scholarship application deadlines for their chosen schools.

Provide opportunities for academic visits right here on campus

Transferring to a new school can be overwhelming. This is why the JCCC offers students the opportunity to speak with four-year institutions during regular visits from university recruiters. Students can find out how the admissions and transfer process to another college or university on the JCCC campus works. Upcoming events for college recruiters include visits from:

  • St. Mary and MidAmerica Nazarene University – September 12
  • Grand Canyon University – September 13
  • College of Nursing Research – September 14
  • Central Methodist University Online and Missouri Western – September 19
  • K-State and Columbia College? University (?) – September 20
  • Rockhurst University – September 21

Find out which courses are transferable statewide

In addition to on-campus opportunities, there are many online resources to help students research how courses transfer their earned credits to other institutions. The Kansas Board of Regents provides a database with system-wide transfer course information for public colleges and universities in Kansas. It lists specific courses that transfer seamlessly to any public institution in Kansas as an equivalent course in terms of credit hours.

JCCC helps students make informed decisions

Our transfer web pages offer several resources to help students make informed and effective transfer decisions. For additional assistance, JCCC transfer advisors are available to ensure students use credits earned at the JCCC for their next college experience.

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