College students – Virginia Marti College http://virginiamarticollege.com/ Tue, 23 Nov 2021 11:18:29 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://virginiamarticollege.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-3-120x120.png College students – Virginia Marti College http://virginiamarticollege.com/ 32 32 Holy Names University Oakland to Cover Tuition Fees for New Eligible Students – Oakland News Now https://virginiamarticollege.com/holy-names-university-oakland-to-cover-tuition-fees-for-new-eligible-students-oakland-news-now/ Mon, 22 Nov 2021 21:09:42 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/holy-names-university-oakland-to-cover-tuition-fees-for-new-eligible-students-oakland-news-now/ Oakland – In a bold commitment to university affordability, Holy Names University has announced that 100% of tuition will be covered for incoming freshman students eligible for the Pell and Cal scholarships. “HNU Tuition Fee Guarantee” is available to new students enrolling at Holy Names University from fall 2022. “Holy Names University has a long […]]]>

Oakland – In a bold commitment to university affordability, Holy Names University has announced that 100% of tuition will be covered for incoming freshman students eligible for the Pell and Cal scholarships. “HNU Tuition Fee Guarantee” is available to new students enrolling at Holy Names University from fall 2022.

“Holy Names University has a long history of providing the financial support needed to make a small private college accessible to more students,” said Elizabeth Mihopoulos, vice president of enrollment management. “With the HNU Tuition Fee Guarantee, we can provide eligible families with the assurance that tuition is 100% covered.”

The HNU tuition guarantee will simplify the financial aid process, which can often be intimidating and confusing for students and families. To take advantage of HNU’s Tuition Fee Guarantee, students simply need to apply to HNU, complete their FAFSA by March 2, and apply for the Cal scholarship. No additional request is required.

The HNU Tuition Fee Guarantee will apply to all available federal and state grants, as well as HNU scholarships and grants, to cover 100% of the tuition fee. Room, meals, manuals and fees are not included. Students must complete their FAFSA and Cal Grant application annually to remain eligible.

Visit hnu.edu to learn more about the HNU Tuition Fee Guarantee.

Holy Names University (HNU) has empowered and prepared a diverse student body for a productive life of leadership and service since 1868. Rooted in Catholic intellectual and spiritual traditions, the University was founded by the Sisters of the Holy Names of Jesus and Mary. HNU offers liberal arts and vocational training. Student-centered, with small classes and lessons in varying formats and schedules, HNU caters to the needs of all learners, including first generation students and working adults. Nestled in the Oakland Hills of California, the university’s idyllic 60-acre campus offers panoramic views of the San Francisco Bay. For more information, visit hnu.edu.

Article based on a press release from Holy Names University, Oakland

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Doña Ana Community College will accept students from Vista College, program will start in fall 2022 https://virginiamarticollege.com/dona-ana-community-college-will-accept-students-from-vista-college-program-will-start-in-fall-2022/ Thu, 18 Nov 2021 23:09:11 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/dona-ana-community-college-will-accept-students-from-vista-college-program-will-start-in-fall-2022/ Vista College airs on Wednesday, October 27, 2021, after closing its doors to its students in Las Cruces. LAS CRUCES – The nursing program at Doña Ana Community College announced Thursday that it will accept students from the recently closed Vista College in Las Cruces. The DACC is currently seeking approval for a stand-alone Licensed […]]]>

Vista College airs on Wednesday, October 27, 2021, after closing its doors to its students in Las Cruces.

LAS CRUCES – The nursing program at Doña Ana Community College announced Thursday that it will accept students from the recently closed Vista College in Las Cruces.

The DACC is currently seeking approval for a stand-alone Licensed Practical Nurse program to transition LPN students from Vista College to DACC. The DACC is expected to receive approval from the New Mexico Nursing Council by January 2022, and the program is expected to begin in fall 2022.

The DACC currently has a career laddering program that allows students to advance in their educational careers to become LPNs. A stand-alone LPN program will help LPN students continue the education they may have started at another school.

Read more: And now? Vista College staff and students share their experiences after closing

Vista College was brutally closed on October 8, declaring bankruptcy and leaving students with nowhere to complete their graduate studies.

Students from different programs have researched different options to complete their education at schools that will accept the credits they earned at Vista College.

To apply for the LPN program, students must apply to the DACC at https://dacc.nmsu.edu/admissions/apply-online/.

Once admitted, students will be required to submit transcripts, which may be unofficial if applying from a closed campus. Students can then make an appointment with an advisor to plan their course at DACC, and receive information about their courses and financial aid. The DACC encourages students to contact the New Mexico Department of Higher Education to obtain a copy of official transcripts, as well as the Federal Department of Financial Aid to begin the loan cancellation application process.

Others read:

This article originally appeared on Las Cruces Sun-News: DACC will accept students from Vista College, program will start fall 2022


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How can we help more community college students graduate https://virginiamarticollege.com/how-can-we-help-more-community-college-students-graduate/ Tue, 16 Nov 2021 22:00:00 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/how-can-we-help-more-community-college-students-graduate/ Like many of her peers who planned to attend community college, Monique L. Harvey faced challenges that often derailed a student’s dreams. His were particularly sharp. She struggled with homelessness, financial insecurity and more. “Where am I going to live, how will I keep my grades, how will I pay?” She remembers asking herself. In […]]]>

Like many of her peers who planned to attend community college, Monique L. Harvey faced challenges that often derailed a student’s dreams. His were particularly sharp. She struggled with homelessness, financial insecurity and more.

“Where am I going to live, how will I keep my grades, how will I pay?” She remembers asking herself.

In her quest for a college degree, Monique saw the promise of an exciting career and economic and social mobility. She has also seen how intimidating it can be. Almost half of all post-secondary students in the United States start at two-year colleges, where graduates earn more than 40% more than a high school graduate. Yet nationally, two-thirds of full-time first-time degree-seeking students who enroll in community college do not graduate within three years.

In Chicago, the three-year community college graduation rate is just under 23%. The reasons are many: from juggling debts, family responsibilities and jobs to lack of role models and pressing social and emotional needs.

Now 23, Monique graduated in 2019 from Kennedy-King College, one of Chicago’s City Colleges, with an associate’s degree, followed by a bachelor’s degree from Columbia College. She now works as a family coach at Metropolitan Family Services with the aim of combining her interests in music, films and community advocacy.

Her journey shines a light on what is possible for all students when a wide range of resources are available. Monique attributes not only her drive and determination to her success, but also support including mentoring and professional coaching, connections to social and housing services, emergency financial assistance and clothing for interviews.

She remembers standing in front of Kennedy-King students during Saturday sessions with her coach, sharing the good news she gathered: “I found an apartment and a job, I’m vice president of the student government and I have a radio show. . “

A research-based approach

Monique is one of thousands of students – at the seven City Colleges and three suburban community colleges – who have enjoyed the full support of Chicago-based One Million Degrees. His achievements are not one-off anecdotes.

They are part of a growing body of evidence across the country that shows the significant impact that support programs have on community college student enrollment, persistence and, most importantly, graduation rates. diploma. “OMD was the backbone that I didn’t know I was missing,” says Monique.

New research from the University of Chicago Inclusive Economy Lab finds that students at City Colleges of Chicago and Harper College in Palatine who enrolled in the OMD program were 18% more likely to graduate within three years. At a time when university enrollments are declining at four-year and two-year colleges, the news is more encouraging: years.

When prospective students are hesitant about what to expect, knowing that there are others out there supporting them can make a huge difference.

The latest findings are based on research from two years ago that found a significant impact on the enrollment and persistence of students in the OMD program.

The role of community colleges has been at the center of the national debate on higher education; President Biden called for free tuition in his Build Back Better plan, though the proposal was later scrapped. But these findings and research from other programs are important when it comes to increasing the odds of graduating and providing a brighter economic future for underrepresented women, black students, and LatinX. In a rapidly changing economy, research is also important for employers, who are increasingly turning to community colleges for training and retraining. In Chicago, “earn and learn” partnerships between community colleges and businesses are growing, offering apprenticeships and career certificates.

The pandemic has tested community college students like never before and made the importance of supportive programs even clearer. OMD is expanding its services this fall to Colorado through a new partnership with the Colorado Department of Higher Education to help low-income adults obtain college degrees or diplomas in Adams County, outside of Denver.

Monique’s story and this latest research is a call to action, to accelerate the growth of programs like MDGs in Chicago and across the country. Community college students, whatever challenges they may face, are capable of extraordinary things when surrounded by supportive relationships.

If we believe in creating a fairer and more equitable society and workforce, we must support them and support them.

Aneesh Sohoni is Managing Director of One Million Degrees.

Send letters to letters@suntimes.com


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Democrats’ bill would deny extra aid to for-profit students https://virginiamarticollege.com/democrats-bill-would-deny-extra-aid-to-for-profit-students/ Fri, 12 Nov 2021 20:56:07 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/democrats-bill-would-deny-extra-aid-to-for-profit-students/ Justin Draeger, president of the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators, said in a statement that the organization was concerned that the increase in the Pell Grant would be limited to certain schools, saying it “would add new complexity to a financial aid system on the verge of a much-needed simplification. He added that […]]]>

Justin Draeger, president of the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators, said in a statement that the organization was concerned that the increase in the Pell Grant would be limited to certain schools, saying it “would add new complexity to a financial aid system on the verge of a much-needed simplification. He added that concerns about quality and accountability in the for-profit sector should be addressed through regulatory changes to the law on higher education; such changes are currently underway at the Ministry of Education.

Stacey Nottingham, director of the Pima campus in Phoenix, where Ms Kern attends, said she hoped the 68% of her roughly 700 students who are recipients of Pell scholarships would not be penalized for past mistakes from other institutions. “We get the impression that private colleges are not good stewards of taxpayers’ money, when we are held to the same, if not higher, standards as other higher education institutions,” Ms Nottingham said.

According to the latest federal data, the average cost of Pima’s largest program is $ 18,715, and students graduate with a median debt of $ 7,600 to $ 9,500. Two years after the start of repayment, 34 percent of borrowers are making progress in repaying their loans, 19 percent are not, and 9 percent are in default or have overdue accounts. The average income of its graduates is $ 20,000 to $ 29,000.

Ms Kern, who works at Kohl’s, while also working on campus as part of the federal co-op program, said she struggled to see how Congress was acting in its best interests. Soon, she will be starting an operating room clerkship and will no longer be able to do other jobs, making the Pell scholarship crucial.

“That $ 550 may not seem like a lot to a lot of people, but it’s less money I have to worry about on my student loan and less worrying about what we have to eat,” he said. she declared. “Life is hard enough as it already is. Why would they want to make it harder for those of us who want to improve our lives, just based on the schools we choose? “


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Alaska Native Success Initiative for students. Sioux Douglas named Philanthropist of the Year. KTOO celebrates National Public Radio Music Day. Jensen-Olson Arboretum raffle. https://virginiamarticollege.com/alaska-native-success-initiative-for-students-sioux-douglas-named-philanthropist-of-the-year-ktoo-celebrates-national-public-radio-music-day-jensen-olson-arboretum-raffle/ https://virginiamarticollege.com/alaska-native-success-initiative-for-students-sioux-douglas-named-philanthropist-of-the-year-ktoo-celebrates-national-public-radio-music-day-jensen-olson-arboretum-raffle/#respond Wed, 10 Nov 2021 08:04:21 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/alaska-native-success-initiative-for-students-sioux-douglas-named-philanthropist-of-the-year-ktoo-celebrates-national-public-radio-music-day-jensen-olson-arboretum-raffle/ The University of Alaska, Indigenous societies and tribes are teaming up to help Indigenous students not only survive, but thrive. Ronalda Cadiente Brown is the UAS Associate Vice Chancellor for Alaska Native Programs (Photo courtesy of UAS). Dr Pearl Brower is the AU’s Senior Advisor on Alaskan Native Achievement, Institutional Diversity, and Student Engagement (photo […]]]>

The University of Alaska, Indigenous societies and tribes are teaming up to help Indigenous students not only survive, but thrive.

On Wednesday afternoon in Juneau, Ronalda Cadiente Brown and Pearl Brower will talk about their work with the Alaska Native Success Initiative – and efforts to create a more welcoming environment for Indigenous students.

Also on the program:

The Juneau Community Foundations say that for someone who is retired, Sioux Douglas “is one of the busiest and most productive volunteers we know.”
  • Juneau’s Philanthropist of the Year, a name familiar to many for her long-standing community service.
  • KTOO Celebrates National Public Radio Music Day … How Music Has Become Even More Important Since The Pandemic.
  • And how you can help the Jensen-Olson Arboretum: an urban oasis for gardeners and flower lovers.

Sheli DeLaney hosts this Wednesday’s show. You can watch Juneau Afternoon Tuesday through Friday at 3:00 p.m. on KTOO Juneau 104.3, online at ktoo.org, and repeated at 7:00 p.m. on KTOO.


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Long Beach to Offer Kindergarten to Grade 12 Students Free Bus Rides https://virginiamarticollege.com/long-beach-to-offer-kindergarten-to-grade-12-students-free-bus-rides/ https://virginiamarticollege.com/long-beach-to-offer-kindergarten-to-grade-12-students-free-bus-rides/#respond Fri, 05 Nov 2021 19:29:42 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/long-beach-to-offer-kindergarten-to-grade-12-students-free-bus-rides/ All K-12 and community college students in Long Beach will soon be able to ride the bus for free, city officials said this week. Long Beach Transit’s board of directors voted on Tuesday to adopt the “LBT GoPass,” an initiative to provide bus transportation to students. “We have taken our first steps towards free and […]]]>

All K-12 and community college students in Long Beach will soon be able to ride the bus for free, city officials said this week.

Long Beach Transit’s board of directors voted on Tuesday to adopt the “LBT GoPass,” an initiative to provide bus transportation to students.

“We have taken our first steps towards free and accessible public transport for all,” said Mayor Robert Garcia in a Tweeter. “We need to move towards a free system that encourages mobility. “

The mayor added that the city is working to extend this program to students at Cal State University Long Beach.

Although the Long Beach Transit board of directors has already approved the program, it has yet to be implemented by the Long Beach Unified School District, or the Long Beach Community College. Formal implementation is expected to take around 60-90 days.

The program will be open to students of participating schools only, and students must obtain a Long Beach Transit GoPass TAP card to use the system.

Existing student customers should continue to use their TAP student cards or cash ticket to use the transit system until the program is implemented and until they receive a new TAP GoPass card from their school, officials said.

As information becomes available, students can visit ridelbt.com/students for program updates.

Also this week, Long Beach City College announced that it would allow homeless students to sleep in their vehicles in a secure parking structure on campus overnight. The Pilot Safe Parking Program is the only known program of its type in the area at a community college and is intended to help homeless college students.

Participating students would also benefit from help from college staff to find longer-term stable accommodation, according to the LBCC.



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Homeless San Jose Students Have Access to Emergency Beds https://virginiamarticollege.com/homeless-san-jose-students-have-access-to-emergency-beds/ https://virginiamarticollege.com/homeless-san-jose-students-have-access-to-emergency-beds/#respond Thu, 04 Nov 2021 23:01:47 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/homeless-san-jose-students-have-access-to-emergency-beds/ Students at San Jose State University say the school does not provide emergency housing for those in need. The university agreed this week to indefinitely extend its one-semester, 12-bed emergency program, but students say they need to make an effort to receive services. “Requiring students to take out loans makes it impossible to get an […]]]>

Students at San Jose State University say the school does not provide emergency housing for those in need.

The university agreed this week to indefinitely extend its one-semester, 12-bed emergency program, but students say they need to make an effort to receive services.

“Requiring students to take out loans makes it impossible to get an emergency bed,” Lana Gomez, president of the Student Homeless Alliance, told a campus press conference on Wednesday.

Gomez says the school told him to maximize his loans in order to receive emergency housing, which is why only one bed was used this semester with more than 100 students requesting housing. She said the university must end this policy.

She said the university had agreed to give students 48 hours of emergency accommodation before asking them to maximize their loans, but believes that is not enough.

In 2021, there were at least 4,000 homeless students, or about 11% of the student body, said Scott Myers-Lipton, a professor at SJSU.

“We have to do it right for these students,” he told the San José Spotlight.

Members of the SJSU Student Homeless Alliance advocated for emergency beds for students in need. Photo by Lorraine Gabbert.

Students can request a bed through SJSU Cares, a program dedicated to helping students meet basic needs. The Student Homeless Alliance has fought for years for beds to be provided for homeless students.

University spokesman Kenneth Mashinchi said the SJSU does not require students to take out a loan to receive short-term emergency housing.

“If students need a long-term housing solution, our SJSU Cares Case Managers work with the student to develop an action plan to ensure that an education funding plan is in place. up, ”he told the San José Spotlight. “In some cases, this may include the common practice of taking out loans to pay for expenses, such as housing, that are part of the college’s investment.”

SJSU Cares, which provides resources and services to students facing a financial crisis, received 184 requests for assistance in 2020-2021 and 156 requests this fall, including 103 for housing and resources for the homeless. Mashinchi said that between July and September, the university provided 85 days of temporary emergency housing: 60 through university housing services and 25 using a hotel voucher program.

According to a 2020 agreement between the university and the Student Homeless Alliance, all students who request a bed are supposed to receive one.

“You can’t do that with the existing student loan policy,” Gomez said, adding that three women told him they were at risk of dropping out because of it.

Sparky Harlan, CEO of the Bill Wilson Center, said the university is trying to trick the public into believing it doesn’t have homeless students. Photo by Lorraine Gabbert.

Citizenship issues make it even more difficult for students seeking help. Student Sammi Shinagawa said this should not be required of students looking for safe places to sleep.

“The basic needs of the student body should come first,” she said. “Instead of broken promises, we want to see actions towards change, firm dates, open communication with our students, and efforts to help the struggling population of precarious housing in the ever-growing San Jose state. to grow. “

The Student Homeless Alliance is also calling for a complete restructuring of the SJSU Cares advisory board, exit interviews showing why students were denied services, a new SJSU Cares website and a mobile app.

“If we had an exit interview, we could understand why over 100 students have applied for accommodation at SJSU Cares so far this semester, but only one bed has been used,” Shinagawa said. “We have no idea why students are deprived of their basic needs or if they are getting the help they need… or how effective our efforts have been. “

The alliance previously demanded 10 secure overnight parking spaces and grants for emergency housing students. A 2019 San José Spotlight report found that the university only offered emergency housing to six students.

Sparky Harlan, CEO of the Bill Wilson Center, said California requires housing first for any facility receiving state funding, but the university does not.

“An emergency shelter should be full,” she said. “What’s the point of keeping your center empty?” To make the homeless disappear. This university is trying to tell you that they don’t have homeless students.

Harlan said asking homeless students to maximize their loans means they are racking up debt and are still homeless.

“We have seen more homeless graduates who have maximized loans here than any other school,” she said. “You cannot demand homeless loans. “

Contact Lorraine Gabbert at [email protected]


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Two-thirds of students struggle with insufficient sleep and poor sleep quality https://virginiamarticollege.com/two-thirds-of-students-struggle-with-insufficient-sleep-and-poor-sleep-quality/ https://virginiamarticollege.com/two-thirds-of-students-struggle-with-insufficient-sleep-and-poor-sleep-quality/#respond Thu, 04 Nov 2021 17:22:27 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/two-thirds-of-students-struggle-with-insufficient-sleep-and-poor-sleep-quality/ Students are not doing well, new research reports. According to the results, around two-thirds of students get poor quality sleep, which affects their academic performance and can lead to the development of mental health problems. Image credits Mohamed Hassan. College has definitely been a fun part of my life, but sleeping well wasn’t really part […]]]>

Students are not doing well, new research reports. According to the results, around two-thirds of students get poor quality sleep, which affects their academic performance and can lead to the development of mental health problems.

Image credits Mohamed Hassan.

College has definitely been a fun part of my life, but sleeping well wasn’t really part of the job. I think most of us can understand this statement. And students enrolled today would probably say the same.

A new study of a sample of 1,113 college-aged students enrolled full-time at university reports that two-thirds of them get poor sleep. Data further shows that students reporting depressive symptoms are nearly four times more likely to experience poor sleep habits. While female students are more likely to have trouble getting enough rest overall, poor sleep can lead to a number of health complications across the board and affect students’ ability to succeed in their studies.

To sleep in class

“Sleep disorders are particularly harmful for students because they are associated with several negative effects on university life,” says lead author Dr Paulo Rodrigues from the Faculty of Nutrition at the Federal University of Mato Grosso, at Brazil. “These include attention and perception failures, a high rate of absenteeism and sometimes dropping out of classes.”

The study interviewed 1,113 undergraduate and postgraduate students (aged 16 to 25) enrolled at the Federal University of Mato Grosso in Brazil. Participants were asked about the quality of their sleep, their EDS, their socioeconomic status, and their body mass index (BMI) was also assessed.

The authors say their findings sound the alarm bells that stressors associated with college life, such as heavy class demands, put students at increased risk for developing sleep disorders. In turn, these disorders pose a real threat to their academic performance and overall health. Universities, the authors conclude, should take steps to promote healthy sleep patterns in their students and take additional steps to protect their mental health.

More than half (55%) of the students enrolled in the study reported having problems with excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS). This was more common among female students in general. This 55% of students as a group were almost twice as likely to report experiencing moderate to high levels of stress and showing signs of depression.

The authors caution that stressors, such as class demands, make students vulnerable to sleep disturbances which in turn affect academic performance and health. They are asking universities to do more to promote positive sleep habits and good mental health.

“The university environment offers greater exposure to factors that can compromise sleep patterns such as school stress and the demands of social life. It is crucial to assess and monitor the sleep patterns, mental health and quality of life of students in order to reduce the risk of developing other chronic diseases, ”adds Dr. Rodrigues. “University directors should plan the implementation of institutional actions and policies. It is about stimulating the development of activities that promote good sleep habits and benefit the mental health of students.

Some of the factors that put students at risk of losing sleep include living away from home, on their own terms, for the first time in their lives; the use of stimulants such as coffee to interfere with sleep and an irregular bedtime. The same factors also increase the likelihood that students will get poor quality sleep, even on days when they have enough time to rest. On average, participants in this study slept about seven hours per day, compared to what is considered the ideal amount for adults, of nine hours per day.

The authors note that problems with the prevalence of EDS and poor sleep among college students have been studied and documented previously, but the link between these and stress or depression has remained poorly understood. In addition, the study highlights a link between poor quality of sleep and the ability of students to succeed in their studies. Students enrolled in the biological and health sciences were more likely to be affected, as were those enrolled in the social and human sciences.

Despite this, the study cannot indicate the exact mechanism that links sleep disturbances to depression, in that it cannot tell if one causes the other or vice versa. The authors note that more research is needed to understand this dynamic.

The article “Poor Quality of Sleep, Excessive Daytime Sleepiness and Association with Mental Health Among University Students” was published in the Annals of Human Biology.


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Benefits of GI Bill May Be Lost for Students Who Fail to Comply with Vaccination Mandate – East Bay Times https://virginiamarticollege.com/benefits-of-gi-bill-may-be-lost-for-students-who-fail-to-comply-with-vaccination-mandate-east-bay-times/ https://virginiamarticollege.com/benefits-of-gi-bill-may-be-lost-for-students-who-fail-to-comply-with-vaccination-mandate-east-bay-times/#respond Wed, 03 Nov 2021 14:38:35 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/benefits-of-gi-bill-may-be-lost-for-students-who-fail-to-comply-with-vaccination-mandate-east-bay-times/ Military veterans eligible for GI Bill benefits at state and community colleges and universities with COVID-19 vaccination mandates may have to drop out of classes and likely lose thousands of dollars in monthly housing allowances if they choose to do not get vaccinated. As the pandemic emptied campuses in 2020, lawmakers changed rules that required […]]]>

Military veterans eligible for GI Bill benefits at state and community colleges and universities with COVID-19 vaccination mandates may have to drop out of classes and likely lose thousands of dollars in monthly housing allowances if they choose to do not get vaccinated.

As the pandemic emptied campuses in 2020, lawmakers changed rules that required veterans-turned-students to take at least some of their classes in person, allowing full-time virtual learning through December. Unless lawmakers make another extension or make other changes, those who refuse the vaccine and are not approved for religious or medical exemptions in schools with warrants, have said they will halt their studies or leave the state or go to private institutions with less restrictive mandates. .

The GI Bill requires veteran students to take at least one course on campus to receive the full monthly housing allowance of about $ 3,300, which in most schools reflects the cost of living. If they don’t, the amount they can receive drops to $ 900.

Hunter Holub, an infantry Marine who served at Camp Pendleton between 2014 and 2018, said he would choose to lose the money and possibly delay his education rather than get the shot. He is studying marketing at Saddleback Community College in southern Orange County.

“I will not sacrifice my religion,” he said. “God comes first.”

There may be consequences with this choice, he said. “I had a combat job in the Marines and it’s not about anything now. I will not be able to survive here and I may have to return to Wisconsin.

The University of California and California State University systems and several community college and private school districts have immunization mandates in place. Some offer weekly or bi-weekly testing as an alternative and some are still working on requirements and possible exemptions.

California is the first state in the country to say it will require COVID-19 vaccines for elementary school children after inoculations receive full federal approval and large corporations, healthcare facilities and entities. governments nationwide will have mandates in place. In many places, people push back and quit their jobs instead.

“Receiving a COVID vaccine continues to be the best way to prevent serious illness and hospitalizations, and to mitigate the spread of the virus,” said Hazel Kelly, spokesperson for the Chancellor’s Office of the University of University’s system. State of California, adding that all students, including veterans, have been given several months to consider their choices.

By the end of September, all Cal State students were required to submit proof of vaccination or have an exemption filed with the university on a medical or religious basis, and these students are now required to undergo regular COVID-19 surveillance tests.

Under the mandate of Mt. San Antonio College in Walnut, which has at least 1,000 veterans enrolled each year, those who are not vaccinated must pass weekly tests and there have been no medical or religious exemptions over the course. of the fall semester.

Desiree Campos Marquez, the college’s veteran services manager as well as financial services and scholarships, said up to 100 veteran students could be affected in the spring. To prepare, the college is considering other plans to support these students, including advocating for an extension of current legislation allowing veteran students to be paid for online classes, she said.

Three lawmakers, Rep. Mike Levin, D-San Juan Capistrano, Rep. David Trone, D-Maryland, and Veterans Committee Chairman Mark Takano, D-Riverside, submitted a legislative proposal last month to expand opportunities in line until at least June.

“Veteran students continue to face significant challenges as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, and while I am proud that we were able to pass strong and historic bipartite legislation to support them, it is clear that we need to build on that work and expand the protections available to them, ”Levin said in a statement.

At Saddleback College in Mission Viejo – one of Orange County’s most popular schools for veterans – officials declined to comment on the vaccination mandate policy, as the requirements are still being decided, said a spokesperson.

Greg Johnson, a 22-year-old army veteran who works in the community college’s veterans office to help students navigate their GI Bill benefits, said he regularly answers questions from veteran students considering dropping out classes rather than getting vaccinated.

It will be a huge problem, not just here, but in many schools across the state, ”he said.

Johnson, who is nearing the end of his own studies and refuses to be vaccinated, said he expected not to return in the spring.

“You can’t live on $ 900,” he said. “It’s impossible.”


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First “deadline” for university students to obtain passes for the COVID-19 vaccine https://virginiamarticollege.com/first-deadline-for-university-students-to-obtain-passes-for-the-covid-19-vaccine/ https://virginiamarticollege.com/first-deadline-for-university-students-to-obtain-passes-for-the-covid-19-vaccine/#respond Tue, 02 Nov 2021 00:34:00 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/first-deadline-for-university-students-to-obtain-passes-for-the-covid-19-vaccine/ The initial deadline for students at Nevada’s public colleges and universities to provide proof that they are fully vaccinated against COVID-19 in order to enroll in spring classes passed Monday, but officials could not say how many have complied. Officials from the Nevada System of Higher Education said they had yet to compile those numbers. […]]]>

The initial deadline for students at Nevada’s public colleges and universities to provide proof that they are fully vaccinated against COVID-19 in order to enroll in spring classes passed Monday, but officials could not say how many have complied.

Officials from the Nevada System of Higher Education said they had yet to compile those numbers.

The early deadline – coinciding with the first day to register for spring classes – was not really a deadline. Students can still show proof of vaccination until registration ends in January.

Chancellor Melody Rose said in a statement Monday that the mandate is to make in-person learning as safe as possible for students and staff.

“Receiving the COVID-19 vaccination is the most effective and scientifically proven way to protect the health and safety of the NSHE community and end the pandemic,” she said.

In August, the State Board of Health voted to require all students attending higher education institutions in Nevada to be fully vaccinated against COVID-19 in order to enroll in spring classes.

Medical and religious exemptions are allowed. And the requirement does not apply to students taking online courses only.

Students who have not provided proof of COVID-19 vaccination have until the last day of registration: January 14 for UNLV and the University of Nevada, Reno, and January 24 for others NSHE campuses, including Nevada State College and the College of Southern. Nevada.

If students are not currently vaccinated, they can still complete their classwork for the fall semester, according to the press release.

At UNLV, the academic chapter of the national conservative student organization Turning Point USA held a campus event on Monday to protest the student’s vaccination mandate. In addition to about fifteen students, the event drew a handful of political candidates, including Noah Malgeri, who is running for the Republican nomination in Nevada’s 3rd Congressional District, and Joey Gilbert, a Republican candidate for the post of governor.

Both said students should be free to make their own decisions about medical treatment.

The UNLV, which has around 31,000 students, has more than 22,000 completed or ongoing COVID-19 student vaccination records, university spokesman Tony Allen said by email on Monday.

The university has also received around 950 requests for medical or religious exemptions from students, and students will be notified as they arise, he said.

The number of students vaccinated against COVID-19 is increasing daily as registrations for the spring semester continue, Allen said, noting that UNLV strongly encourages students to upload their immunization records or submit an application. exemption “as soon as possible to make sure they are able to get the lessons they have received.” must stay on track to graduate.

CSN and Nevada State College did not have data on student vaccination against COVID-19 available on Monday.

“The percentage of students reporting their COVID-19 vaccination is increasing every hour as they attempt to register for classes (class registrations starting today),” Nevada State College executive vice-president said, Tony Scinta, in a statement to the Review-Journal. “The percentage of students receiving exemptions is still being determined, with some students subject to an appeal process. We believe the numbers will stabilize in the coming weeks, so we should be able to provide an accurate number at this point. “

NSHE employees face a December 1 deadline to be fully vaccinated against COVID-19, following a September decision by the higher education system’s board. Medical and religious exemptions are allowed.

As of Monday, 85% of NSHE employees had been vaccinated, according to the system’s website. That leaves 3,500 people who are not and could potentially be made redundant.

At UNLV, 82.5% of employees are vaccinated, while 86.8% are at Nevada State College and 79.2% at CSN.

Contact Julie Wootton-Greener at jgreener@reviewjournal.com or 702-387-2921. Follow @julieswootton on Twitter. Review-Journal Photographer Bizuayehu Tesfaye contributed to this report.


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