College students – Virginia Marti College http://virginiamarticollege.com/ Wed, 11 May 2022 06:05:15 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://virginiamarticollege.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-3-120x120.png College students – Virginia Marti College http://virginiamarticollege.com/ 32 32 Report – NBC Los Angeles https://virginiamarticollege.com/report-nbc-los-angeles/ Wed, 11 May 2022 06:05:15 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/report-nbc-los-angeles/ If you’ve recently attended college – or know someone who has – you know this isn’t for the financially sensitive. College is a stressful experience for many, aside from the financial burden it places on students and families. The cost of a four-year university, including housing, has increased by 12% since 2012, according to financial […]]]>

If you’ve recently attended college – or know someone who has – you know this isn’t for the financially sensitive.

College is a stressful experience for many, aside from the financial burden it places on students and families.

The cost of a four-year university, including housing, has increased by 12% since 2012, according to financial firm NerdWallet. The company released data last week with estimates of how much student loan debt the class of 2022 can expect by the time they graduate with a bachelor’s degree.

According to NerdWalletby the time students graduate from a four-year university, which takes an average of five years, they will likely have to pay close to $40,000 in student debt.

President Joe Biden has hinted at some form of student loan forgiveness in recent weeks, though details and timing are still unclear.

Here’s a look at student loan debt by the numbers, according to data from NerdWallet, the College Board, and California’s public universities.

How much loan debt Sshould students expect?

Students graduating from high school in 2022 and planning to attend four-year college could rack up up to $40,000 in student debt by the time they graduate, according to NerdWallet projections.

The financial firm estimates that 42% of college graduates will rack up student loan debt while attending four-year college.

How much does it really cost to go to college?

The cost to attend college in the United States averages $22,700, an increase of 12% over the past 10 years, according to NerdWallet.

Data from college council shows that the average cost of attendance has continued to rise over the decades.

The students in 1990 paid an average of $3,800 for tuition and fees at a public four-year university, while students faced an average tuition bill of $10,740 in the 2021 school year -22, according to college council.

From 2002 to 2011, the cost of a four-year university, including room and board, increased by 22%.

Adding in room, board, and other expenses, students are likely to face a much higher cost than tuition.

In California, tuition for one year at a CSU campus exceeds $5,000, while UC Tuition Fees costs over $13,000.

Can students make their way through college these days?

As the cost of higher education continues to rise, NerdWallet experts say it’s nearly impossible to pay for college with a minimum wage job.

According to the financial sitea student earning the federal minimum wage would have to work 52 hours a week to pay the average cost of attending a public university.

In California, of course, the number of hours would be different due to the state’s higher minimum wage.

The flow federal minimum wage sits at $7.25, while California’s is $15, nearly double the national rate. In Los Angeles, the minimum wage is expected to rise to $16.04 in July.

In San Francisco, the current minimum wage is $16.32.

What about student loan forgiveness?

President Joe Biden has hinted at the possibility of canceling some student loan debt in the future.

The president is expected to make a decision in the coming weeks. As for how much, if any, the president can eliminate, time will tell. Federal student loan repayments remain suspended for borrowers through September.

California Rep. Tony Cardenas, who met with Biden last month with members of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, said the president could write off student debt using his executive powers.

“He said, ‘Yeah, I’m considering doing something on that front,'” Cardenas told The Associated Press. “And he also smiled and said, ‘You’re going to like what I’m doing on this too.

62% of student borrowers who responded to a survey said their debt had a negative impact on their mental health, according to polling firm Momentive. To find out if there’s any light at the end of the tunnel, we asked student financial planner Mark Kantrowitz if this debt could be forgiven and what President Joe Biden can do about it.

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UGC develops draft guidelines to address student mental health issues https://virginiamarticollege.com/ugc-develops-draft-guidelines-to-address-student-mental-health-issues/ Sat, 07 May 2022 05:20:42 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/ugc-develops-draft-guidelines-to-address-student-mental-health-issues/ UGC has required all institutes to set up a student service center. He asked for suggestions regarding guidelines for the promotion of physical fitness. University Scholarship Commission NEW DELHI: To address the challenges faced by students due to stress and peer pressure, the University Grants Commission has developed guidelines for the promotion of physical fitness, […]]]>

UGC has required all institutes to set up a student service center. He asked for suggestions regarding guidelines for the promotion of physical fitness.

University Scholarship Commission

NEW DELHI: To address the challenges faced by students due to stress and peer pressure, the University Grants Commission has developed guidelines for the promotion of physical fitness, sports, student health, well-being. being, psychological and emotional well-being in Indian tertiary institutions.

Read also | Former IIT Madras headmaster is new JEE Apex board chairman: Ministry of Education

The commission also solicited suggestions from HEI students and teachers, parents and members of civil society. Comments or suggestions may be sent to UGC at policyfeedbackugc@gmail.com within two weeks from the date the Public Notice is uploaded to the UGC website. The review was posted on Friday, May 6, 2022.

These guidelines have been developed to provide support to all students enrolled in higher education institutions (HEIs), with particular emphasis on promoting physical fitness and sporting activities, creating safeguards against pressure academic, peer pressure, behavioral issues, stress, career issues, depression and other student mental health issues; instill positive thinking in the student community and promote positive and supportive networks for students, the UGC said in its notice.

According to the draft UGC guidelines, “every HEI should have a Student Services Center (SSC) responsible for addressing and managing issues related to stress and emotional adjustment”.

Read also | Why not NEET UG? The demand for postponement from the aspirants increases; Minister of Education, silent NTA

The SSC will provide counselling, referral, physical and mental health services in online mode, in person, via a telephone helpline or in group counseling sessions depending on the circumstances, he said. .

The SSC will have access to a student’s profile database and will also keep separate records of students appearing to be more vulnerable and stress prone for additional support and resilience building exercises.

“The National Assessment and Accreditation Council (NAAC) and the National Institutional Ranking Framework (NIRF) may consider assigning certain points/ratings for SSC provisions in HEIs,” according to the notice.

“Mental health course(s) may be included in the curriculum with credits to be awarded for course completion,” he said.


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Report: Arizona needs to get more high school and college graduates to fill available jobs | Explore wellness https://virginiamarticollege.com/report-arizona-needs-to-get-more-high-school-and-college-graduates-to-fill-available-jobs-explore-wellness/ Thu, 05 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/report-arizona-needs-to-get-more-high-school-and-college-graduates-to-fill-available-jobs-explore-wellness/ Arizona will issue far fewer bachelor’s degrees through the end of the decade than it takes to fill jobs, according to a new report presented at The Future of the Workforce, a discussion sponsored by the Dashboard MAP from the University of Arizona Eller College of Management on Thursday, April 21. “Arizona is at an […]]]>

Arizona will issue far fewer bachelor’s degrees through the end of the decade than it takes to fill jobs, according to a new report presented at The Future of the Workforce, a discussion sponsored by the Dashboard MAP from the University of Arizona Eller College of Management on Thursday, April 21.

“Arizona is at an inflection point in its economic trajectory with a relatively low college completion rate and growing labor demand for workers with bachelor’s degrees,” the Advancing report notes. Arizona’s Economy: Investment in Workforce Development.

Ron Shoopman of the Arizona Board of Regents warned that because of this low graduation rate, Arizona will not have enough people to fill the jobs created by development in the private and public sectors of the Arizona.

Advancing Arizona’s Economy: Investment in Workforce Development report estimates that Arizona will issue 26,300 fewer bachelor’s degrees than the economy needs each year through 2030.

“Last year, Arizona companies imported, hired and moved to Arizona 19,000 people with four-year degrees to fill jobs they couldn’t fill with people in Arizona who couldn’t. weren’t willing but probably just not qualified,” Shoopman said. .

Shoopman, however, doesn’t blame the Arizonans. He said it goes back to what the Board of Regents found in 2019: Arizona has a 79% high school graduation rate. One in five students in Arizona does not graduate from high school.

“We know … if you don’t have a high school diploma, you probably don’t have a job,” Shoopman said. “Less than half of the people in the state who don’t have a high school diploma are unemployed.”

Shoopman said the report made it clear that Arizona needed to do better with its students and prepare people for the job market. However, Shoopman said Arizona doesn’t need to direct students to four-year colleges. He said state leaders also needed to focus on certification programs, community colleges and trade schools.

Jennifer Pullen, senior research economist at Eller College‘s Center for Economics and Business Research, said a surplus of available jobs in Arizona has grown significantly since the early months of the pandemic. In January, Arizona had 241,000 open jobs in Arizona, up 80,000 jobs from February 2020, according to Pullen. Although Tucson was slower to recover those jobs compared to Phoenix, the statewide unemployment rate for March was 2.9%, a 23-year low.

“There are mainly two reasons why the unemployment rate is falling: either these unemployed people find a job or these unemployed people leave the labor market,” Pullen said.

Pullen speculated that many people chose to retire during the pandemic or left the workforce to care for themselves or their families. Skyrocketing house prices have also boosted homeowners’ net worth, which could allow them to stay out of the labor market for longer periods. Migration must also be considered as part of the equation, although international migration has declined during the pandemic. Pullen noted that inflation could bring workers back into the job market.

Pima Community College Chancellor Lee Lambert said the job market is changing to match new trends.

“We’re moving from a first-curve society, the industrial era, to a second-curve era, which is a knowledge-based digital era and central to that is this notion of skills,” Lambert said.

The overwhelming statement from every presenter and panelist is the urgent need to prepare Arizona’s workforce for the jobs the state is creating.

Mister Car Wash CEO John Lai said during his appearance before the panel that investing in early education is the obvious answer to the impending increase in job openings.

“There is a revenue issue,” Lai said. “We need to pay teachers more or invest in our K-12 school systems and we are not doing that. The high school graduation rate was shocking. It is a precursor to college.

According to the Board of Regents report, Arizona is currently at an inflection point where jobs are growing too quickly for people to fill vacancies. Shoopman said it’s imperative that the state prepare Arizona’s next generation of students and workers by investing in the education system to retain students in the system.

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Pro rugby player scores goals for St. John’s College students https://virginiamarticollege.com/pro-rugby-player-scores-goals-for-st-johns-college-students/ Wed, 04 May 2022 04:45:00 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/pro-rugby-player-scores-goals-for-st-johns-college-students/ Wednesday, May 4, 2022, 4:45 p.m.Press release: St John’s College Hastings New St. John’s College Rugby Institute Coach Sam McNicol’s passion runs deep for educating up-and-coming players, on and off the field. Despite hanging up his boots for the foreseeable future due to a series of injuries, the former Hawke’s Bay, Chiefs and Hurricanes fullback […]]]>

New St. John’s College Rugby Institute Coach Sam McNicol’s passion runs deep for educating up-and-coming players, on and off the field.

Despite hanging up his boots for the foreseeable future due to a series of injuries, the former Hawke’s Bay, Chiefs and Hurricanes fullback said the opportunity to take on the role was something he he couldn’t refuse.

“I didn’t think twice about it because I really like working with this age group. You see the most gains in the development of a rugby player who is between the early to mid-teens.

Alongside his role at St. John’s College, Sam is a Secondary Schools Rugby Development Officer with the Hawke’s Bay Rugby Union.

Sam credits his success as a rugby player to the development he received during his formative years and hopes to replicate that for the young players at SJC.

“Personally, I think a lot of my development as a rugby player happened in high school. That’s probably where I made the most improvements to then move on to professional level.

His career highlights include making his Super Rugby debut at the age of 19 for the Hurricanes against the Chiefs and then playing for the Chiefs in a winning game against Wales.

In his new role, Sam is responsible for the Year 9 and Year 10 players involved with the College‘s Rugby Institute.

“To be able to give back in this area is great. I really want to unlock a few abilities so they can perform and potentially achieve their dreams.

He says the rugby program at St. John’s College is very well placed.

“My aim for these boys once they complete the Under-15s and institute grades is to be capable and really promising young Premier XV players who can represent the school well.”

However, he believes their attitude off the pitch is just as important for success on the pitch.

“It’s about being really diligent, having a good work ethic and an open mind, and being willing to listen, accept constructive criticism, and move on.”

Acting Principal Willy Kirsten says Sam is a great addition to the school’s rugby foundation.

“We are delighted to have Sam on board. He has a wealth of knowledge and expertise that will no doubt help our boys develop and inspire them on and off the pitch.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

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Despite challenges, students who quit want to come back / Public News Service https://virginiamarticollege.com/despite-challenges-students-who-quit-want-to-come-back-public-news-service/ Tue, 03 May 2022 23:02:39 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/despite-challenges-students-who-quit-want-to-come-back-public-news-service/ In the wake of the pandemic disruptions, research shows the majority of students in North Dakota and beyond who have left school in the past two years want to return despite continued obstacles. The report of Gallup and Lumina Foundation surveyed over 11,000 current students, others who recently “quit” and prospective students. He revealed that […]]]>

In the wake of the pandemic disruptions, research shows the majority of students in North Dakota and beyond who have left school in the past two years want to return despite continued obstacles.

The report of Gallup and Lumina Foundation surveyed over 11,000 current students, others who recently “quit” and prospective students. He revealed that difficult classes were a big factor for those leaving school in 2021.

For traditional-aged students, said Stephanie Marken, Gallup’s executive director for education research, the stress of being isolated during their later high school years made them less prepared for a college setting.

“So we’re seeing high levels of course difficulty for students who report having considered quitting for this reason,” she said. “A lot of students who traditionally wouldn’t struggle to persevere, even in a first-year program, are really struggling to do so. So we’re also seeing a huge need for academic support.”

Just before the pandemic, the North Dakota University System released the findings of a student well-being survey. Nearly 40% reported feeling down or depressed on several days over a two-week period. Another 24% said these experiences made it difficult to complete their academic work.

The report also found that for those who stayed in school, their belief in the benefits of receiving a degree is a big part of why they stayed. Courtney Brown, Lumina Foundation’s vice president for impact and planning, said current and prospective students are seeing how this achievement can help them increase their knowledge and pay off.

“High percentages said they knew they needed a degree or certificate to learn skills, to get a job,” she said, “so the survey actually shows that there is great value in higher education. And that’s even for people who have never been in higher education.”

The report found that multiracial bachelor’s and associate’s degree students were the groups most likely to say it was hard to stay in school over the past year. Many have cited the high cost of college and the need for financial assistance to complete their education.

Support for this report was provided by Lumina Foundation.

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Senate Democrats discuss child care challenges facing students during policy hearing https://virginiamarticollege.com/senate-democrats-discuss-child-care-challenges-facing-students-during-policy-hearing/ Sat, 30 Apr 2022 00:41:00 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/senate-democrats-discuss-child-care-challenges-facing-students-during-policy-hearing/ BLUE BELL, April 28, 2022 — State Sen. Katie Muth (D-Berks/Chester/Montgomery), chair of the Senate Democratic Policy Committee, joined Sen. Maria Collett, Sen. Amanda Cappelletti, Sen. Carolyn Comitta and Senator Judy Schwank to host a public hearing on the challenges the college faces students and staff in child care. “Our hearing today highlighted the frustrating […]]]>

BLUE BELL, April 28, 2022 — State Sen. Katie Muth (D-Berks/Chester/Montgomery), chair of the Senate Democratic Policy Committee, joined Sen. Maria Collett, Sen. Amanda Cappelletti, Sen. Carolyn Comitta and Senator Judy Schwank to host a public hearing on the challenges the college faces students and staff in child care.

“Our hearing today highlighted the frustrating reality that affordable, accessible and quality childcare is an unmet need for families across the Commonwealth,” Muth said. “We must support parents and single mothers who are trying to lift themselves out of poverty and economic struggle, to make ends meet, to continue their education and improve the lives of their children. It’s time for Harrisburg and Washington to step up and invest in child care.

The Senate Democratic Policy Committee hearing, held at the Montgomery County Community College Health Sciences Center, featured three panels of testimony from students, educators, advocates and public policy experts who will discuss the lack of affordable and accessible childcare services in higher education institutions. .

“Parents who want to further their education deserve the opportunity to do so,” Cappelletti said. “By creating resources for parents to have access to affordable, quality child care while they continue their education, we can open up more economic opportunities for Pennsylvania families to succeed.”

According to a study by the Institute for Women’s Policy Research, nearly four million American undergraduates, or 22% of all undergraduates, are raising children while attending post-secondary education. The study found that 70% of student parents are mothers – and more than two in five student parents are single mothers.

“More than 20% of undergraduate students are also parents. Ensuring that these student-parents have access to child care is a matter of fairness and economy,” said Collett. “Our Commonwealth cannot grow and prosper when parents of young children are unable to save for the future, find jobs to support their families, and pursue and complete their education. It is high time that the Commonwealth recognizes this and is investing adequately in our child care infrastructure.With billions of federal ARP dollars unspent, now is the time to do so.

One of the programs discussed at the hearing was the federal program Access to Child Care Means Parents in Schools (CCAMPIS) program fully funded by the U.S. Department of Education to establish on-campus child care programs that help low-income student-parents stay in school and graduate. Pennsylvania also offers the Child care work program run by the Early Learning Resource Centers.

“Many Pennsylvanians have faced the difficult decision of whether to afford child care or pursue higher education. Child care programs provide essential educational skills and support to children and their families,” Comitta added. “Affordability, quality and access to these programs are the barriers and disparities we must remove and ensure that all working parents can shape a healthy, safe and prosperous future for their families.”

Hearing participants included May Yaghnam, mother of four and student at Community College of Philadelphia; Kristina Valdez, Executive Director, On the Way; Kelly Lake; Child Care Access Means Parents in School (CCAMPIS) Project Director, Community College of Philadelphia; Dr. Kalani Palmer, Associate Professor of Human Development and CCAMPIS Project Director, Indiana University of Pennsylvania; and Tracey Campanini, Assistant Secretary, Pennsylvania Office of Child Development and Early Learning.

“It is clear that the business model of child care is broken and creative solutions are needed to meet the modern needs of Pennsylvanians. Linking childcare and higher education is one way to allow parents to pursue the education they need to increase their earning potential, and it would also benefit staff and faculty,” Schwank said. “Today’s hearing has provided us with some ideas on how to expand child care services across the Commonwealth and provide these crucial services at more colleges and universities in Pennsylvania.”

All of the testimony submitted during the Policy Hearing and the full video are available at SenatorMuth.com/Policy

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Reflecting on the COVID-19 pandemic as students https://virginiamarticollege.com/reflecting-on-the-covid-19-pandemic-as-students/ Thu, 28 Apr 2022 18:12:41 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/reflecting-on-the-covid-19-pandemic-as-students/ Loss and Gratitude Can Take Different Forms For freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, this is their first in-person spring term at Davis, and for most seniors, this is their second and last. It is a joyous time; not only is the spring term known to be Davis’ best, but it’s also a joy to return to […]]]>

Loss and Gratitude Can Take Different Forms

For freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, this is their first in-person spring term at Davis, and for most seniors, this is their second and last. It is a joyous time; not only is the spring term known to be Davis’ best, but it’s also a joy to return to activities that students haven’t been able to participate in for two years. There is a glorious sense of relief as the world begins to function a little closer to what it used to be.

Yet this return to “normal” life can also be painful, especially when contrasted with what we have lost in the pandemic. Young people have faced a unique set of challenges in recent years: many have juggled the financial burdens of pandemic shutdowns, cared for and supported sick family members, and learned how to survive a pandemic while being full-time students and dealing with the issues that come with being young adults.

Many students, especially seniors, reflect on their time at Davis and mourn the little things lost over the past two years. Meeting up with friends for a pho at MU, bumping into an old acquaintance outside of Wellman, cramming for midterms with classmates in the reading room—those little life events, as insignificant as they may have appeared a few years ago, finally become normal again. It’s bittersweet, however, since we haven’t been able to fully experience these things during our four years of college.

People have suffered varying levels of loss during this pandemic. The small social interactions that many have lost over the past two years, though small compared to the far greater consequences the pandemic has left on human life and health, are still valid for grieving. It’s normal to feel excitement about returning to old habits and experiences while also feeling melancholy about having to go back to them.

That being said, there are things that may never change now that we are coming out of the pandemic – some for the better. This includes flexibility with hybrid courses, greater openness to remote working, and wearing masks when sick.

Additionally, a number of students have found new directions in life as the pandemic has caused them to re-evaluate their values ​​and prioritize their personal well-being. For some, it might feel like a new career path or a new hobby. For others, it may be feeling exhausted from virtual learning and ready to take a break from class.

Every year seniors face some kind of apprehension about the future, but it can be even scarier to step into a world where the future has seemed so uncertain for the past few years. Leaving a place, while feeling like we can’t fully experience it, can create many conflicting emotions, feelings that some of us on the editorial board are having right now.

But with five weeks left of the spring term, it’s time to soak up all you can from Davis, whether you’re graduating or returning to school in the fall. Stroll down the Arb on a warm evening, lay in the grass at the Wednesday Farmer’s Market, and cycle at night without a sweatshirt because if there’s anything the pandemic has taught us, it’s is that moments like these, shared with those you love, are over and best celebrated in the present.

Written by: Editorial Board

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Texas students want more affordable housing in Austin https://virginiamarticollege.com/texas-students-want-more-affordable-housing-in-austin/ Thu, 28 Apr 2022 10:28:10 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/texas-students-want-more-affordable-housing-in-austin/ AUSTIN (KXAN) — With apartment rent prices soaring across Austin, college students fear being squeezed out. Now, a student-led city commission is gearing up to make suggestions to city leaders. Friday, the College Students Commission — made up of 15 students from the local college — will consider send recommendations to the Austin City Council. […]]]>

AUSTIN (KXAN) — With apartment rent prices soaring across Austin, college students fear being squeezed out.

Now, a student-led city commission is gearing up to make suggestions to city leaders.

Friday, the College Students Commission — made up of 15 students from the local college — will consider send recommendations to the Austin City Council.

Edwin Bautista, a student at the University of Texas at Austin, wrote the document that will be put to the vote. The grad student told KXAN that he would love to live near campus, but he just can’t afford it.

“I’ve been commuting for three years,” Bautista said. “I will say last year was the worst.”

“We’re trying to help the city understand these issues from the students’ perspective,” he added.

The commission’s recommendations include:

  • Direct the City Manager and the Housing and Planning Department to collaborate with non-profit housing organizations, including student housing cooperatives (co-ops) to develop more affordable housing
  • Lead the City Manager and the Housing and Planning Department to “increase transparency and accessibility” of the University District Housing Trust Fund
  • Direct the City Manager to work with the Director of the Neighborhood Office of Housing and Community Development to reevaluate part of the University Neighborhood Overlay (UNO)

UNO is a bonus structure designed to increase housing density in UT’s West Campus neighborhood and encourage affordable housing development.

Layering allows developers to build more units than a site’s basic zoning allows if a number of those units qualify as SMART housing, which means safe, mixed-income, accessible, affordable reasonable and transit-oriented.

Despite all the growth and newly available apartments within West Campus, many students remain overpriced.

KXAN spoke with Awais Azhar, board member of HousingWorks, a local nonprofit that works to address affordability issues.

Azhar is also a UT graduate student who is fortunate, he says, to live in a university-owned apartment complex near West Sixth Street.

“In the last year alone, we’ve seen rents go up all over Austin, and you can imagine what that’s doing for students,” Azhar said. “It’s really hard for them.”

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Shortage of housing and soaring rents weigh on American students https://virginiamarticollege.com/shortage-of-housing-and-soaring-rents-weigh-on-american-students/ Tue, 26 Apr 2022 14:29:22 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/shortage-of-housing-and-soaring-rents-weigh-on-american-students/ BERKELEY, Calif. — Terrell Thompson, a sophomore at UC Berkeley, slept in his car for nearly two weeks at the start of the school year last fall, living in a suitcase hidden in the trunk and texting dozens of homeowners a day in a desperate search for a place to live. This high-achieving student from […]]]>

BERKELEY, Calif. — Terrell Thompson, a sophomore at UC Berkeley, slept in his car for nearly two weeks at the start of the school year last fall, living in a suitcase hidden in the trunk and texting dozens of homeowners a day in a desperate search for a place to live.

This high-achieving student from a low-income household in Sacramento, California was majoring in business administration at one of the most prestigious universities in the world. Still, Thompson tucked his 6-foot frame into the back seat of his Honda Accord at night, wondering how he could find a home in the exorbitant Bay Area city of San Francisco.

“Academically, it was tough, because I worry about finding a place to live and I worry about my clothes and I worry about my car being broken into all the time,” said Thompson, 19. years old, who now lives in a studio he found last September. “I was anxious 24/7.”

Students across the United States are looking for housing for the 2022-23 school year and if 2021 was any indication, it won’t be easy. College students from California to Florida were denied on-campus housing last fall and found themselves sitting year-round at home or living in motel rooms or vehicles as surging rents and decades of failure to build enough student accommodation have reached a fever pitch.

For some colleges, the housing crisis was linked to increased demand for students who had been stuck at home during the pandemic. For others, including many in California, the shortage reflects a deeper conflict between colleges and landlords who don’t want new housing built for students that they say increases congestion and noise.

In March, the University of California, Berkeley said it would have to limit student enrollment because of a lawsuit by angry neighbors over the school’s growth. State lawmakers have fast-tracked a solution to allow the campus to enroll as many students as planned for the fall 2022 semester, but the legislation does nothing to produce more housing.

Nationally, 43% of students at four-year colleges experienced housing insecurity in 2020, up from 35% in 2019, according to an annual survey conducted by the Hope Center for College, Community, and Justice in India. Temple University. Students reported being unable to pay utilities, rent or mortgage, living in overcrowded units or moving in with others due to financial hardship.

And for the first time since it began tracking basic needs in 2015, the survey found an equal percentage – 14% – of four-year and two-year college students who had experienced homelessness. over the past year, said Mark Huelsman, the center’s director of policy and advocacy.

“It’s a function of rising rents, the inability of communities and institutions to build enough student housing, and other university costs that create a perfect storm for students,” he said. he declares.

For some students, the lack of affordable housing could be the difference between going to college or not. Others go into massive debt or live so precariously that they miss out on all the extracurricular benefits of higher education.

Jonathan Dena, a first-generation student from the Sacramento area, almost rejected UC Berkeley because of the lack of housing, even though it was his “dream program.” He found a studio in the heavily subsidized Rochdale apartments for less than $1,300 a month, but he may have to move as the stripped-down units could close for an earthquake renovation.

Dena, 29, wants to continue living within walking distance of campus for a solid college experience.

But the urban studies major and student government housing commission officer said “it’s a bit scary” how high rents are close to campus. Online listings showed a new one-person bedroom for $3,700, as well as a 240-square-foot (22-square-meter) room for two people sharing a bathroom for nearly $1,700 pp. month.

“If I go to school in Berkeley, I would like to live in Berkeley,” he said.

Nationally, rents have risen 17% since March 2020, said Chris Salviati, senior economist at Apartment List, but the increase has been higher in some popular college towns. Chapel Hill, North Carolina, saw its rents go up 24% and Tempe, Arizona, 31%.

In some cases, rent increases have been exacerbated by a lack of on-campus housing.

Last fall, demand for on-campus housing was so high that the University of Tampa offered freshmen a tuition break if they deferred until fall 2022.

Rent in Knoxville has climbed 36% since March 2020, and it could get worse after the University of Tennessee announced a new lottery system for its dorms this fall, saying it must prioritize housing for a larger freshman class.

Even two-year community colleges, which traditionally did not provide dormitories, are rethinking student needs as housing costs rise.

Last October, Long Beach City College launched a pilot program to provide up to 15 homeless students in a gated parking lot. They sleep in their car and have access to bathrooms and showers, electrical outlets and the internet while they work with counselors to find permanent housing.

Uduak-Joe Ntuk, chairman of the college’s board of trustees, hesitated when asked if the program would be renewed.

“I mean no, but I think we will,” he said. “We are going to have new students in the fall semester of this year who will be in a similar situation, and for us to do nothing is untenable.”

California prides itself on its robust higher education system, but struggles to accommodate its four-year colleges. Berkeley is notoriously tough, with stiff competition for the few affordable apartments within walking distance of campus.

“I definitely wasn’t ready to be this stressed about housing every year,” said Jennifer Lopez, 21, a UC Berkeley senior from Cudahy, in southeast Los Angeles County, and the first in her family to attend university.

She imagined she would spend the four years on campus in dormitories, but found herself looking for a safe and affordable place to sleep. The Urban Studies major currently divides an attic into what is technically a one-bedroom apartment shared by four undergraduate students, one of whom sleeps in the dining room.

The total monthly rent is nearly $3,700 — ridiculously high in most US cities — but she’s grateful for that.

“If I hadn’t heard of this place, I was either going to end up living in a basement or this other apartment I know (where) the girls are struggling with leaks and mold” , Lopez said.

UC Berkeley’s Basic Needs Center, which runs a pantry for students and faculty, found in a Snapshot survey that a quarter of undergraduates said they “lack a safe place , regular and adequate to stay and sleep at night” at some point since October .

“It’s huge,” said Ruben Canedo, co-chair of UC’s system-wide basic needs committee. “This generation of students navigates the most expensive cost of living market while having the least financial support accessible.”

Thompson, the business administration major, started looking for an apartment last May, after spending her freshman year at home taking distance learning courses to save money. He soon realized that his $750 rental budget was grossly insufficient, and as a sophomore, he no longer qualified for dorm priority.

By the time classes started in late August, he was in a panic. He tried to commute from his home in Sacramento, leaving before 6 a.m. for the 80-mile (130 kilometer) trip to Berkeley and returning home around midnight to avoid traffic.

But it was exhausting, so he took to sleeping in his car. Initially, he parked far away in a place with no parking limits. Then he parked in a lot between two student dormitory complexes closer to campus, where a rambunctious party kept him up at night.

He took classes, studied and ate sparingly to save on skyrocketing food costs. He looked at apartments where five people were crammed into two bedrooms with pared-down personal effects stored under the beds.

He slept in his car for nearly two weeks until a friendly landlord who had also grown up in a low-income home contacted him, offering a studio apartment within walking distance of campus. The rent is $1,000 a month and he hopes to stay until he graduates.

“I think I have a bit of PTSD,” he said.

Most students have no idea about the housing situation when they choose to attend UC Berkeley, said Sanaa Sodhi, a 19-year-old freshman, and the university needs to do more to prepare students and support them in their search.

The political science major is excited to leave the dorms and move into a two-bedroom apartment where she and three friends take over the lease. The unit is older but a bargain at $3,000 a month, she said. The roommates were willing to pay up to $5,200 for a safe place near campus.

“You honestly don’t know the seriousness of the situation until you get there,” she said, adding that the owners hold all the cards. “They know that whatever price they charge we will inevitably have to pay because we really have no choice but maybe to live off our cars.”

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AP reporter Terence Chea contributed from Berkeley, Calif.

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Ukrainian students in the United States face fear and uncertainty https://virginiamarticollege.com/ukrainian-students-in-the-united-states-face-fear-and-uncertainty/ Mon, 25 Apr 2022 13:27:00 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/ukrainian-students-in-the-united-states-face-fear-and-uncertainty/ Placeholder while loading article actions When Solomia Dzhaman thinks of Ukraine, she thinks of her grandparents’ farm – picking ripe strawberries to eat, pulling apples from trees in the orchard, and picking currants from the vine so her grandparents can sell them in the market. “Pastoral, quiet memories like that,” she said. “This is the […]]]>
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When Solomia Dzhaman thinks of Ukraine, she thinks of her grandparents’ farm – picking ripe strawberries to eat, pulling apples from trees in the orchard, and picking currants from the vine so her grandparents can sell them in the market.

“Pastoral, quiet memories like that,” she said. “This is the scene that plays in my head when I think of Ukraine.”

She tries to cling to the images of the home she once knew, not the images that saturate the news now: men with bullets in their heads lying in the road, people fleeing over bridges, bombs smashing houses. She left the Columbia University campus unable to focus on her in-person engineering classes while her friends were on the front lines and loved ones lived in fear.

The war has upended the lives of Ukrainian students in the United States and prompted university and federal officials to act quickly to help.

For some students here on a visa, it raised questions about when and if they could safely return. For some settled here more permanently, it has brought up painful emotions about home and heart and how best to help in a humanitarian crisis. And for some Ukrainian students, the war has kept them from continuing their studies abroad this spring, as they cross borders to flee violence – or turn to help in combat.

In Bucha, the story of a man’s body abandoned on a Russian killing field

“I have no legal right to leave the country,” Dmytro Tymoshenko, 29, said from Boryspil outside Kyiv, where he has been staying this year rather than returning to his master’s degree program in law at the University of California at Berkeley Law School. . “And I have no moral right to leave the country – because the country needs me.”

While his classmates are on campus, he is in the middle of a war. “Many towns are completely destroyed,” he said. “Many towns are experiencing a complete humanitarian disaster: no electricity, no gas, no light, no water, nothing at all. They are simply dying. He and others began to work in a volunteer battalion, making Molotov cocktails, cooking food, driving aid to military posts. Now he is fundraising for thermal visors, body armor, radio transmitters and other military supplies.

“We defend our freedom,” Tymoshchenko said.

Within days of the outbreak of war, American higher education leaders joined in ask federal officials for help supporting the approximately 1,700 Ukrainian students enrolled here. In March, the US Department of Homeland Security designated Ukraine for temporary protected status for 18 months, allowing students whose visas are about to expire to apply to stay in that country.

On Monday, DHS officials announced a new step, special help for students to eligible students from Ukraine experiencing extreme economic hardship – temporarily suspending regulations, allowing them to apply for more work hours and take fewer courses.

As the weeks go on, it is increasingly clear that it will be difficult for many Ukrainians to return home anytime soon, said Barbara Snyder, president of the Association of American Universities.

Schools and organizations have responded with individual support and, in some cases, broader efforts to help students.

The Institute of International Education has many efforts to helpand has already distributed emergency scholarships to more than 225 Ukrainian students, according to Jonah Kokodyniak, the organization’s senior vice president.

The University of Chicago has created comprehensive courses scholarships and support for war-affected students, including increased financial and other aid for students here, and more help for students applying to colleges at its center in Paris.

Hampton University, a historically black university in Virginia, offered to fund tuition, room and board for the summer semester for 50-100 students studying in Ukraine.

Columbia University, which offers a full scholarship to displaced students, has also launched efforts including emergency scholarships for Ukrainian scholars.

And at many colleges, students and others have organized relief efforts and fundraisers. At Johns Hopkins University, four Peabody Conservatory graduate students, including a flutist from Ukraine, staged a benefit concert last week which ended with a melody by the late Ukrainian composer Myroslav Skoryk.

The students described horror and uncertainty as they tried to balance the unthinkable abroad with the logistical obstacles here. A pregnant Columbia student wondered if her husband could join her in New York since she won’t be returning home to Ukraine after the semester ends. A graduate student who fled to Poland before war broke out, juggles studying at Berkeley early in the morning with his day job, his two-year-old daughter, and his evenings helping refugees at home. frontier.

Others report the trauma of watching from afar. Tetiana Tytko, a graduate student at the University of Maryland in Lviv, western Ukraine, said when the shelling started she didn’t know what to think or what to do. When she saw the streets where she lived and worked being bombed, she was at first unable to believe it was real. “I was completely delusional,” she said. She would wake up not wanting to look at her phone, frightened by the news she might see but unable to think of anything but the war.

While her parents were happy that she was safe out of the country, she found it painful not to be there. When her family is in bomb shelters, she is unable to reach them.

She and others at U-Md. created a group of Ukrainian students and started fundraising, collecting and stuffing old suitcases with tourniquets and other emergency medical supplies. “We never feel like we do enough,” she said.

The university’s police department donated 20 used bulletproof vests which were shipped to Ukraine. David B. Mitchell, the head of the department, said he had seen television footage of elderly people taking up arms to fight, and doctors, nurses and other volunteers in the line of fire, all without a bulletproof vest. He said it was an overwhelming encounter with Ukrainian students at U-Md. and hearing about their aunts and uncles, grandparents and friends being “attacked, because they want democracy — they want freedom.”

Mariya Curry, who studies psychology at Columbia, said many of her relatives lived in Irpin and hid in their basements for several days without food. “My heart is there,” she said. “I can’t stop crying.”

After weeks of street battles, kyiv’s suburb of Irpin is the scene of ruins

Dzhaman, who is from the Ivano-Frankivsk region of Ukraine, spent the early days of the war constantly reading the news and trying to help others who needed a safer place to stay, offering a shelter with her extended family in the west.

When another Ukrainian student at Columbia University told her that he looked at the live map of the bombed places and saw his old neighborhood, the places where he shopped, his apartment, on the map, she understood.

They were all “just crying together,” she said.

Dzhaman, who has US citizenship, requested permission to complete the semester virtually so she could be with her parents and sister in Illinois. She posted on social media asking for donations of blood clotting products and tourniquets, and was surprised by the volume of responses – thousands of dollars worth of supplies, which her family shipped to Kyiv and Mariupol.

She plans to return to Ukraine, where she used to spend every summer, to help rebuild once the war is over and revisit her old haunts – if she can. “If everything is blown up and bombed…I’ll never see him again,” she said worriedly.

She stopped. “It will be the first thing I do when I get back: go to the orchard, sit in the grass, eat fresh strawberries.”

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