University colleges – Virginia Marti College http://virginiamarticollege.com/ Mon, 11 Apr 2022 15:32:05 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://virginiamarticollege.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-3-120x120.png University colleges – Virginia Marti College http://virginiamarticollege.com/ 32 32 University colleges in Mumbai seek to launch new courses and increase student capacity https://virginiamarticollege.com/university-colleges-in-mumbai-seek-to-launch-new-courses-and-increase-student-capacity/ Fri, 01 Apr 2022 08:55:47 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/university-colleges-in-mumbai-seek-to-launch-new-courses-and-increase-student-capacity/ A number of colleges have sent applications to Mumbai University to increase the capacity of students A total of 151 applications have been received by Mumbai University from colleges so far. A number of colleges have sent applications to Mumbai University in a bid to increase student intake and launch new courses. A total of […]]]>

A number of colleges have sent applications to Mumbai University to increase the capacity of students

A total of 151 applications have been received by Mumbai University from colleges so far.

A number of colleges have sent applications to Mumbai University in a bid to increase student intake and launch new courses. A total of 151 applications have been received by Mumbai University from colleges so far.

In the majority of applications, colleges have shown their willingness to start a new business course. There are also a significant number of applications to start a new bachelor’s degree course in management studies. While some colleges also want to offer post-graduation studies to students starting master’s degree programs, TOI reported.

In their applications, some colleges have asked to start new courses in accounting, BMS and finance while many also want to offer LLM programs and five- and three-year law courses. Some colleges have also submitted their Self-Assessment Report (SSR) to the National Assessment and Accreditation Council (NAAC). However, according to the rules, colleges are not allowed to start new programs or new divisions without a valid NAAC grade.

While Mumbai University approved most of the applications, some colleges were denied clearance by the committee of experts. However, later these colleges also got approval after management was summoned for a hearing. Therefore, all 151 applications were approved.

Highlighting the overwhelming number of applications received, a senior university official said “the two years of the pandemic have seen very slow growth”. He added that the colleges believe that the number of students will increase in the coming years. He acknowledged that no new colleges had been granted permission this year, but said colleges had applied for additional admission. Also, the official said that the proposals will be sent to the state and they will make the decision.

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ADDB participates in the launch of 5 public funded university colleges in Jordan worth AED 3.80 million https://virginiamarticollege.com/addb-participates-in-the-launch-of-5-public-funded-university-colleges-in-jordan-worth-aed-3-80-million/ Tue, 22 Mar 2022 08:50:15 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/addb-participates-in-the-launch-of-5-public-funded-university-colleges-in-jordan-worth-aed-3-80-million/ United Arab Emirates, Abu Dhabi: The Abu Dhabi Development Fund (ADDB) has been involved in the launch of five ADDB-supported government university colleges in Jordan, at a cost of approximately AED80.3 million, and these Strategic projects are part of the development of the Jordanian public university. programme, which includes the establishment of 27 projects in […]]]>

United Arab Emirates, Abu Dhabi: The Abu Dhabi Development Fund (ADDB) has been involved in the launch of five ADDB-supported government university colleges in Jordan, at a cost of approximately AED80.3 million, and these Strategic projects are part of the development of the Jordanian public university. programme, which includes the establishment of 27 projects in the education sector, worth a total of AED466 million to help sustain and develop the country’s education sector.

The Fund has financed several development projects in Jordan in strategic sectors, such as energy, transport, water and agriculture, health and education under the 2012 United Arab Emirates grant to Jordan, worth AED4.6 billion, or $1.25 billion, under the Gulf Fund for Development programme. , where the projects have helped support the efforts of the Jordanian government to achieve sustainable economic and social development in the country.

The projects that were opened included a building for the Faculty of Finance and Business, a building for the Faculty of Engineering at Al-Bayt University in Mafraq, at a total cost of around 40 million dirhams, the opening of the building of the Faculty of Nursing, and the construction and equipment of a building for the Center for Research and Energy Studies at Hussein Bin Talal University in Maan, with a total value of 22 million d ‘AED, and at the University of Muata in Karak, the building of the Faculty of Pharmacy was opened at a cost of 18.3 million dirhams.

For his part, HE Nasser Al-Shiraida, Minister of Planning and International Cooperation of Jordan, expressed his thanks and gratitude to the United Arab Emirates, its wise leadership for its position alongside the Jordanian people and its role of first plan to help the Jordanian government achieve sustainable development.

He also thanked the Abu Dhabi Development Fund for its efforts in financing and managing development grants, noting that these efforts have contributed to increasing the efficiency of services provided to Jordanian citizens and advancing economic development. in the country, emphasizing that Jordan views the Fund as a key development partner of the government, and we look forward to working with the Fund to strengthen this partnership, thereby contributing to the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals.

His Excellency the Minister pointed out that the public universities support program is among the projects financed by the Fund under the UAE grant to Jordan, where the program has constituted an important qualitative change in the development of Jordanian public universities. , especially since it included many development projects that had an obvious impact on students and the local community, in addition to its role in the construction of new colleges that constituted a qualitative change for universities by welcoming students from different disciplines.

He said: Since 1974, the Fund has financed a set of strategic projects in Jordan, through concessional loans to implement several development projects in priority economic and social sectors for the Jordanian government such as infrastructure, health, education, industry and mining, agriculture and irrigation, and renewable energy, and implements the UAE grant to Jordan worth 1 .25 billion dollars in vital priority sectors of the Jordanian government.

“The Fund has had a strategic relationship with the Jordanian government for more than four and a half decades, as the Fund has been instrumental in financing many strategic development projects in Jordan,” said HE Mohammed Saif al-Suwaidi, Director General of Abu Dhabi. development, noting that these projects have had a positive impact on the growth of the Jordanian economy thanks to the marked improvement in economic indicators and have been an important factor in improving the quality of life of the population, supporting services base and job creation.

“The opening of colleges of education through the program financed by the fund for the rehabilitation of public universities is part of our concern to promote the education sector, and to provide buildings and facilities in Jordanian universities among the best international standards, to improve the reality of educational life, to absorb more students in various disciplines and to meet the various needs of the labor market,” he said.

HE Khalifa Abdullah Al Qubaisi, Deputy Managing Director of the Abu Dhabi Development Fund, said: “We are delighted to be part of the launch of five public university colleges in the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan, which contribute to the development of the education in Jordan. , and enable universities to achieve their goals of improving infrastructure, developing teaching methods and supporting basic services, noting that the new projects will also help meet the capacity of educational monuments to accommodate the continuous increase in the number of students from different disciplines, in addition to their leading role in The Jordanian labor market has been provided with its needs for expertise and qualified skills.”

A number of Jordanian university presidents also highlighted the importance of supporting the Abu Dhabi Development Fund for Universities and funding strategic projects that have contributed to the achievement of universities’ goals and aspirations by absorbing the growing number of students on an annual basis.

Professor Dr. Hani Al Damour, President of Al Bayt University, said the UAE grant, which was administered by the Abu Dhabi Development Fund, enabled the university to construct the building of the Faculty of Business Administration and the Faculty Building. of Engineering, where the two projects have been implemented under the highest international specifications, and they take place in an area of ​​approximately 20,000 square meters, which has contributed to the expansion of the students’ capacity of Al Bayt University to reach 10,000 students, pointing out that the two projects include many facilities such as classrooms, theaters and art laboratories. Thanks to the projects, the University has also been able to activate many community activities.

For his part, Prof. Dr. Atef Al Kharasha, President of Hussein Bin Talal University, said that funding from the Abu Dhabi Development Fund enabled the university to complete the second phase of its establishment, where The projects financed by the Fund mainly reflected on the development of the university’s infrastructure, the improvement of its capacities to serve students, scientific research and the local community, as well as the development of the industrial sector in the region of southern Jordan.

Professor Dr. Arafat Aoujan, President of Atta University, pointed out that the Abu Dhabi Development Fund had financed the establishment of three university colleges, in addition to the construction of the Faculty of Pharmacy, which was recently inaugurated and played a positive role in development. of the college and raise the level of its performance, which has enabled the college to obtain a Jordanian quality certificate, in addition to the great development of the academic content of its study plans, and the start of the introduction of the program of master’s degree in pharmaceutical sciences, pointing out that the project consists of four floors with an area of ​​more than 10 thousand One square meter contains several classrooms and equipped laboratories, in addition to three tracks, and a number of laboratories have been allocated in the project for scientific research in the field of pharmaceutical sciences.

Since 1974, the Abu Dhabi Development Fund has financed hundreds of development projects in Jordan, with a total value of approximately AED6.5 billion. Projects with a strategic dimension, the Jordanian government achieves its economic and social priorities and advances sustainable development.

-Ends-

About the Abu Dhabi Development Fund:

A national institution of the Government of Abu Dhabi aims to achieve sustainable economic development locally and in developing countries. The Fund was established in 1971 with the aim of assisting developing countries by granting loans on favorable terms to finance sustainable development projects and by managing long-term investments. The Abu Dhabi Development Fund also helps support the national economy by financing exports from the United Arab Emirates. Since its inception, the Fund has made many achievements locally and globally, making significant contributions to support development in 103 developing countries around the world. Over the past 50 years, the Fund’s development and investment projects worth more than AED 150 billion have contributed to the sustainable economic development of developing countries.

www.adfd.ae

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Many university colleges in Delhi are holding open classrooms to ensure physical distancing https://virginiamarticollege.com/many-university-colleges-in-delhi-are-holding-open-classrooms-to-ensure-physical-distancing/ Wed, 23 Feb 2022 12:38:12 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/many-university-colleges-in-delhi-are-holding-open-classrooms-to-ensure-physical-distancing/ Many colleges in Delhi University are holding classes in open grounds and also in batches to ensure physical distancing as the majority of students started attending physical classes after the university reopened after a hiatus in two years imposed by Covid. The colleges also offer regular counseling to students facing psychological issues to help them […]]]>

Many colleges in Delhi University are holding classes in open grounds and also in batches to ensure physical distancing as the majority of students started attending physical classes after the university reopened after a hiatus in two years imposed by Covid. The colleges also offer regular counseling to students facing psychological issues to help them adjust to the new environment.

The University of Delhi reopened last Thursday and the students are numerous. Colleges expect more students to arrive in the coming days. However, the return of a large number of students poses problems in ensuring compliance with Covid protocols. In addition, cases of physiological problems have increased among students, according to college principals. With this, the colleges are scrambling to ensure that quality education is provided to the students and at the same time their health is not compromised.

“We try to follow all the Covid protocols. As students come in large numbers, it is difficult to maintain social distancing. There is also an overcrowding problem. Social distancing is not possible, but we are strictly adhering to the wearing of masks and other protocols,” Hindu College Principal Anju Shrivastava told PTI.

As colleges open after a two-year lull, Shrivastava believes it will take time for things to calm down. “We still have students coming. It will take time to fully open up and we are working on it. We hope we will be settling in very soon. We have to prioritize everything – from classes to the cafeteria to the hostel. All things are to be considered,” she noted. Meanwhile, the principal of Ramjas College, Manoj Khanna, noted that the level of anxiety was very high among the students. “Suddenly the psychological problems among the students increased. The level of student anxiety is very high among students. We refer them to advisers,” he said. He claimed that it is quite difficult to maintain social distancing inside campus.

“Our infrastructural facilities are not such that we can fit all the students so we are taking classes in batches. We cannot isolate students. Although we try to maintain social distancing in the classrooms, but the students find themselves outside and it is very difficult to force them to maintain social distancing,” he added.

The colleges said they ensure that appropriate counseling is provided to students. Guru Tegh Bahadur Khalsa College Principal Jaswinder Singh said: “We have trained counsellors. We offer advice to students. The counselor comes twice a week. But if there are urgent cases, we provide the contact details of the student adviser”. To avoid overcrowding, some teachers also take classes in the open. “We have given freedom to sit outside to hold outdoor classes. Several teachers are taking outdoor classes,” the principal of the Hindu college said.

Miranda House director Bijayalaxmi Nanda said the priority was to provide students with a full university experience bearing in mind that their health is not affected. “We suggest the college has open ground as transmission is less when it is out in the open. We make sure they come outside and into the classroom when asked to open the doors and windows. We make sure they wear masks,” she said. The principal also informed that the college is launching a new welfare program for this year to provide monetary support to students facing financial hardship.

“We are also working to provide support for students, such as providing them with living expenses. we are creating a list of students who needed social assistance and we will provide it to them as living costs in the city may have increased,” she said. “Apart from the scholarship, this is the novelty, we are starting, which will only be available for this year. Under this, the monetary support will be given to needy students. As needed, a certain amount will be provided to students during this time as social support,” she added.

Read all the latest Assembly news, breaking news and live updates here.

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Many Delhi University colleges have open classrooms to ensure physical distancing https://virginiamarticollege.com/many-delhi-university-colleges-have-open-classrooms-to-ensure-physical-distancing/ Tue, 22 Feb 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/many-delhi-university-colleges-have-open-classrooms-to-ensure-physical-distancing/ Delhi University colleges also provide regular counseling to students facing psychological issues Delhi University colleges keep open classrooms to ensure physical distancing NEW DELHI: Many colleges in Delhi University are holding classes in open grounds and also in batches to ensure physical distancing as the majority of students started attending physical classes after the university […]]]>

Delhi University colleges also provide regular counseling to students facing psychological issues

Delhi University colleges keep open classrooms to ensure physical distancing

NEW DELHI: Many colleges in Delhi University are holding classes in open grounds and also in batches to ensure physical distancing as the majority of students started attending physical classes after the university reopened after a hiatus in two years imposed by Covid. The colleges also offer regular counseling to students facing psychological issues to help them adjust to the new environment.

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The University of Delhi reopened last Thursday and the students are numerous. Colleges expect more students to arrive in the coming days. However, the return of a large number of students poses problems in ensuring compliance with Covid protocols. In addition, cases of physiological problems have increased among students, according to college principals. With this, the colleges are scrambling to ensure that quality education is provided to the students and at the same time their health is not compromised.


Read also | Reopening of schools and colleges: list of colleges and states that will resume offline classes on February 21

“We try to follow all the Covid protocols. As the students come in large numbers, it is difficult to maintain social distancing. There is also an issue of overcrowding. Social distancing is not possible but we strictly respect the wearing of masks and other protocols,” Anju Shrivastava, director of the Hindu university, told PTI. As colleges open after a two-year lull, Shrivastava believes it will take time for things to calm down. “We still have students arriving. It will take time to fully open and we are working on it. We hope to settle in very soon. We have to prioritize everything – from classes to the cafeteria to the hostel. All things are to be considered,” she noted.

Read also | JK LG ensures interactive environment for students after schools reopen

Meanwhile, the principal of Ramjas College, Manoj Khanna, noted that the level of anxiety was very high among the students. “Suddenly the psychological problems among the students increased. The level of student anxiety is very high among the students. We refer them to counsellors,” he said. He claimed that it is quite difficult to maintain social distancing inside campus. “Our infrastructure is not such that we can fit all students, so we are taking classes in batches. We cannot isolate students. Although we try to maintain social distancing in classes, but students find themselves at outside and it is very difficult to force them to maintain social distancing,” he added. The colleges said they ensure that appropriate counseling is provided to students.

Headmaster of Guru Tegh Bahadur Khalsa College, Jaswinder Singh said, “We have trained counselors. We provide counseling to students. The counselor comes twice a week. telephone number of the student adviser”. To avoid overcrowding, some teachers also take classes in the open. “We have given freedom to sit outside to hold open-air classes. Several teachers are taking open-air classes,” the headmaster of the Hindu college said.

Read also | Schools reopen in Goa; Shiv Sena opposes consent forms for parents

Miranda House director Bijayalaxmi Nanda said the priority was to provide students with a full university experience bearing in mind that their health is not affected. “We suggest the college has open ground as transmission is less when they are out in the open. We ensure they are outside and in class when asked to open doors and windows. We make sure they wear masks,” she said. The principal also informed that the college is launching a new welfare program for this year to provide monetary support to students facing financial difficulties. “We are also working to provide support to students, such as providing them with living expenses. By next week, we are creating a list of students who need social assistance and we will provide it to them as the cost of subsistence in the city may have increased,” she said. “Apart from the scholarship, this is the novelty that we are starting, which will only be available for this year. Under this, the monetary support will be given to needy students. Based on the need, an amount will be provided to students during this time as social assistance,” she added.


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Hijab row limited to only 8 high schools and junior colleges in Karnataka: Govt https://virginiamarticollege.com/hijab-row-limited-to-only-8-high-schools-and-junior-colleges-in-karnataka-govt/ Sun, 20 Feb 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/hijab-row-limited-to-only-8-high-schools-and-junior-colleges-in-karnataka-govt/ The hijab controversy refuses to die down as some students have remained adamant about being allowed to attend classes with the ‘hijab’ and ‘burqa’. Representative picture Bengaluru: The hijab row persists in only eight high schools and junior colleges out of a total of 75,000, the Karnataka government said on Thursday, expressing confidence that the […]]]>

The hijab controversy refuses to die down as some students have remained adamant about being allowed to attend classes with the ‘hijab’ and ‘burqa’.

Representative picture

Bengaluru: The hijab row persists in only eight high schools and junior colleges out of a total of 75,000, the Karnataka government said on Thursday, expressing confidence that the problem will be resolved. The High Court, in its interim order pending consideration of all hijab row related petitions, last week banned all pupils from wearing saffron shawls, scarves, the hijab and any religious flag in the classroom.

However, the controversy refuses to die down as some students have remained adamant about being allowed to take classes with ‘Hijab’ and ‘Burqa’. Karnataka’s Minister of Primary and Secondary Education, BC Nagesh, told media here that the “problem” is confined to a handful of secondary schools and junior colleges.

Read also | Karnataka guest speaker resigns over alleged refusal to wear hijab

“Out of 75,000 schools and colleges, the problem persists in eight colleges. We will resolve this. We are happy that all students followed our order,” he said. Tension reigned at Sarala Devi College in Ballari as parents and students staged a sit-in outside the facility after burqa-wearing students were barred from entering, authorities citing a court order. After being persuaded by the police and lawyers, the protesters dispersed.

At the Vijay Institute of Paramedic Sciences in Belagavi, the unrest has led to tensions. Six people who had raised the slogan “Allahu Akbar” in front of the college were arrested. According to police, many people who were not associated with the college took part in the protest. After identifying them, the police arrested them. At Chitradurga Women’s PU College, female students staged a protest outside the college. A student complained that he was not allowed to enter his “own college”.

“Are we not students of this college? We have been coming here for five years. The court only issued a temporary order (restricting the use of hijab and saffron scarves). Our only request is that we take off the burqa but we will wear the hijab. If we are not allowed in, we sit outside every day,” the student said.

Read also | Covid-19: Universities in Karnataka urged to postpone bachelor’s exams for one month

Another student said they were supposed to take the preparatory exams but due to the ban they were forced to sit in the hot sun. In Chikkamagaluru, students held a rally and questioned why Hindus were allowed to use their “bindi and bangles religious symbol” if there were any restrictions.

On January 1, six female college students from Udupi attended a press conference organized by Campus Front of India (CFI) in the coastal city to protest against college authorities for refusing them entry to class by wearing the hijab. This was four days after they asked the principal to grant permission to wear the hijab in class, which was refused. Until then, students wore hijabs on campus and entered the classroom after removing headscarves, college principal Rudre Gowda said.

“The institution had no rules on wearing the hijab as such and since no one had used to wear it in class for the past 35 years. The students who came with the request had the support external forces,” Rudre Gowda said.


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Delhi University colleges reopen, students back on campus after two years, India News News https://virginiamarticollege.com/delhi-university-colleges-reopen-students-back-on-campus-after-two-years-india-news-news/ Fri, 18 Feb 2022 05:47:21 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/delhi-university-colleges-reopen-students-back-on-campus-after-two-years-india-news-news/ Classrooms are buzzing with students wearing masks, queues at roadside canteens and restaurants, and bustling crowds at nearby metro stations – the University of Delhi campus in New Delhi, India’s capital came alive on Thursday as students returned to colleges after a nearly two-year hiatus. The university was closed in March 2020 due to the […]]]>

Classrooms are buzzing with students wearing masks, queues at roadside canteens and restaurants, and bustling crowds at nearby metro stations – the University of Delhi campus in New Delhi, India’s capital came alive on Thursday as students returned to colleges after a nearly two-year hiatus.

The university was closed in March 2020 due to the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The nearest Vishwavidyalaya metro station was teeming with students as they made their way to their colleges on North Campus, where they were greeted by guards carrying thermal scanners in their hands.

Canteens and roadside restaurants were buzzing, bringing joy to owners as well as students, many of whom were able to bond with their friends over a cup of tea for the very first time.

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As students lined up outside stalls to enjoy momos, tea, sweet corn and other snacks, business was picking up at these restaurants that had been strapped for cash due to the closure of the university. When PTI surveyed inside classrooms, most students were seen wearing masks.

Manish Kansal, a teacher at Hindu College, said the students’ excitement was quite apparent despite their masked faces.

“We were meeting our students for the first time. They were wearing masks but we could see the excitement in their eyes. Some students were even clicking pictures of the college, roads and traffic outside,” he said. he told PTI.

Gajendra Mohan Thakur, a 26-year-old Campus Law Center student, said, “I was excited to be back on campus. The university was closed for about two years, and the online study mode was not effective enough to replace the offline mode. mode of education. It’s time to reclaim our lost years.

Freshman Kalyanai Harbola made no attempt to hide her excitement and said the reopening of the campus had put her life back on track. We are excited to join offline classes as it provides a whole new slew of opportunities and exposure to shape our future, she said.

Earlier this month, several student associations had organized demonstrations demanding the reopening of the campus. Authorities decided to resume classes after a drop in the number of COVID-19 cases in the nation’s capital.

Read also | India makes helmets and safety harnesses a must for kids on horseback

While there was good attendance from students in the nation’s capital, attendance from other states was low, with numbers not expected to increase until next week. The directors, however, said the turnout was better than they expected. According to teachers, attendance was higher among second graders than first graders.

Not everyone was happy with the resumption of offline classes, however, as students at the outpost station complained of soaring rents at paid guesthouses. Gauri, a third-year English (Honours) student from Kerala, said PG rates have tripled. PG landlords take advantage of the situation and ask the students to triple the amount of the actual rent. They ask Rs 16,000 for a triple room. It’s too much,” she said.

Several outstation students that PTI spoke to complained that they had too few days to plan their return. I’m anxious because we have exams in the next 20 days. We have to settle a lot of things and also study for the exams. It’s extra pressure. Students were asking for blended courses but our request was denied. They said it was not possible, said Aditi Jain, 24, an English masters student.

Watch | Gravitas Plus: Is Delhi University unfair to students?

Another student, Mamatha Rose, 18, from Kerala, who looked visibly tired after queuing at Vishwavidyalaya metro station, also shared her grouse. “They informed us earlier that you have to come to Delhi. But two days ago they told us that you can take courses online. I mean there is so much mismanagement. We had already booked tickets and my friend and her dad helped us book a PG, she said.

“They didn’t give us enough time to change. Today I can’t attend classes because I have to change. They should have provided us with accommodation,” Rose added.

Even those who have managed to find accommodation in university hostels are no better off. With many hostels being renovated, students are forced to find accommodation elsewhere.

“Assignment of the hostel is in progress but, anyway, places are limited and students are given hostel rooms based on a merit list, so very few students get them”, said a student from Kirori Mal College.

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Hijab row limited to 8 high schools and junior colleges in K’taka: Govt https://virginiamarticollege.com/hijab-row-limited-to-8-high-schools-and-junior-colleges-in-ktaka-govt/ Thu, 17 Feb 2022 16:10:00 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/hijab-row-limited-to-8-high-schools-and-junior-colleges-in-ktaka-govt/ bangalore: The hijab row persists in only eight high schools and junior colleges out of a total of 75,000, the Karnataka government said on Thursday, expressing confidence in solving the problem. The High Court, in its interim order pending consideration of all hijab row related petitions, last week banned all pupils from wearing saffron shawls, […]]]>

bangalore: The hijab row persists in only eight high schools and junior colleges out of a total of 75,000, the Karnataka government said on Thursday, expressing confidence in solving the problem.

The High Court, in its interim order pending consideration of all hijab row related petitions, last week banned all pupils from wearing saffron shawls, scarves, the hijab and any religious flag in the classroom.

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Delhi University colleges reopen with full Covid-19 standards | Delhi News https://virginiamarticollege.com/delhi-university-colleges-reopen-with-full-covid-19-standards-delhi-news/ Thu, 17 Feb 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/delhi-university-colleges-reopen-with-full-covid-19-standards-delhi-news/ NEW DELHI: Colleges of the University of Delhi are reopening for all undergraduate and postgraduate courses from today with full COVID guidelines after two years of full offline mode. In accordance with the university’s directive, colleges must be completely disconnected from today. Aditi, a 2nd year student from Gargi College, told ANI, “I feel very […]]]>
NEW DELHI: Colleges of the University of Delhi are reopening for all undergraduate and postgraduate courses from today with full COVID guidelines after two years of full offline mode.
In accordance with the university’s directive, colleges must be completely disconnected from today.
Aditi, a 2nd year student from Gargi College, told ANI, “I feel very excited and nervous at the same time because I will make new friends, meet new people. Since I joined middle school, today will be my first day attending the offline class. It feels very weird to meet my classmates for the first time after interacting with them virtually. My parents advised me to wear the mask all the time and disinfect my hands.”
Tisha, another 2nd year student from Gargi middle school, said: “I’m quite excited but I’m also worried. Even my mother warned me about everything because the middle schools opened at full capacity. In my class , there are about 70 students, but the seating arrangement is actually only for 50-55 students, so 5-6 students sit on a single bench and it is difficult to follow social distancing norms.

FROM PTI collegeUniversity colleges reopened classes, in New Delhi on Thursday, February 17, 2022. Photo: PTI” placeholdersrc=”https://static.toiimg.com/photo/42706777.gif” imgsize=”23456″ resizemode=”4″ offsetvertical=”0″ placeholdermsid=”” type=”thumb” src=”https://static.toiimg.com/photo/42706777.gif”/>

Students at Miranda House College as Delhi University colleges reopened classes, in New Delhi on Thursday, February 17, 2022. Photo: PTI

Professor Promila Kumar, Principal of Gargi College, said, “I think I am more excited than my students because life is back in college and I can see vibrant faces around me, colorful surroundings.
“Students were losing a lot. University is an important part of their life which they missed when they were sitting at home. Now they will gain a lot in college as well,” he added.
“Regarding the hybrid model, we are not equipped enough for each class to manage teaching in hybrid mode. But, I asked my teachers if they could help students by taking lessons online or giving them extra time or sharing their recorded lectures, PPTs to help them,” Kumar added.

FROM middle school1 ANICollege of Commerce (SRCC. Photo: ANI” placeholdersrc=”https://static.toiimg.com/photo/42706777.gif” imgsize=”23456″ resizemode=”4″ offsetvertical=”0″ placeholdermsid=”” type=”thumb” src=”https://static.toiimg.com/photo/42706777.gif”/>

A student takes a selfie with others on the first day of college after easing COVID-19 restrictions at Shri Ram College of Commerce (SRCC. Photo: ANI

Kumar further added that last week college preparations were done for the benefit of the students. All rooms have already been disinfected. The canteen, which had been closed for two years, was whitewashed and cleaned. The Bookstore is open. Disinfectants are placed in different places in the college. We put on extra masks if someone does not receive the mask. The temperature control is already there at the door. We are following all COVID protocols and a recorded message at set intervals will be played advising the student to follow the protocols.

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Delhi University colleges reopen, students back on campus after two years https://virginiamarticollege.com/delhi-university-colleges-reopen-students-back-on-campus-after-two-years/ Thu, 17 Feb 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/delhi-university-colleges-reopen-students-back-on-campus-after-two-years/ The city’s colleges reopened on Thursday after being closed for nearly two years due to the COVID-19 pandemic, with students saying they are excited to be back on campus. Vishwavidyalaya metro station near Delhi University was packed as large numbers of students headed for colleges on the north campus. Gajendra Mohan […]]]>

The city’s colleges reopened on Thursday after being closed for nearly two years due to the COVID-19 pandemic, with students saying they are excited to be back on campus.

Vishwavidyalaya metro station near Delhi University was packed as large numbers of students headed for colleges on the north campus.

Gajendra Mohan Thakur, a 26-year-old Campus Law Center student, said, “I’m excited to be back on campus. The university was closed for about two years. The online study mode was not effective enough to replace the offline mode. mode of education. It’s time to reclaim our lost years.

Delhi University colleges were closed in March 2020 following the outbreak of the coronavirus infection.

There have been drastic changes in student life, with a particular focus on online classes, but now, as lives are getting back on track, “we students are excited to join offline classes because it provides a whole new bunch of opportunities and exposure to shape our future,” said Kalyani Harbola, a freshman.

“Offline courses also provide a better platform for student-teacher interaction and better learning,” Harbola said.

Student associations staged protests earlier this month demanding the reopening of campus. The decision to reopen facilities came after a drop in the number of COVID-19 cases in the nation’s capital.

Delhi has reported 766 cases of COVID-19 along with five deaths, while the positivity rate has fallen to 1.37%, according to data shared by the health ministry here on Wednesday.

(Only the title and image of this report may have been edited by Business Standard staff; the rest of the content is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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Hijab row limited to just 8 high schools and junior colleges in K’taka, says government – The New Indian Express https://virginiamarticollege.com/hijab-row-limited-to-just-8-high-schools-and-junior-colleges-in-ktaka-says-government-the-new-indian-express/ Thu, 17 Feb 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/hijab-row-limited-to-just-8-high-schools-and-junior-colleges-in-ktaka-says-government-the-new-indian-express/ By PTI BENGALURU: The hijab dispute persists in only eight high schools and junior colleges out of a total of 75,000, the Karnataka government said on Thursday, expressing confidence that the issue will be resolved. The High Court, in its interim order pending consideration of all hijab row related petitions, last week banned all pupils […]]]>

By PTI

BENGALURU: The hijab dispute persists in only eight high schools and junior colleges out of a total of 75,000, the Karnataka government said on Thursday, expressing confidence that the issue will be resolved.

The High Court, in its interim order pending consideration of all hijab row related petitions, last week banned all pupils from wearing saffron shawls, scarves, the hijab and any religious flag in the classroom.

However, the controversy refuses to die down as some students remained adamant about being allowed to take classes with ‘Hijab’ and ‘Burqa’ on Thursday as well.

Karnataka’s Minister of Primary and Secondary Education, BC Nagesh, told media here that the “problem” is confined to a handful of secondary schools and junior colleges.

“Out of 75,000 schools and colleges, the problem persists in eight colleges. We will resolve this. We are happy that all students followed our order,” he said.

Tension reigned at Sarala Devi College in Ballari as parents and students staged a sit-in outside the facility after burqa-wearing students were barred from entering, authorities citing a court order.

After being persuaded by the police and lawyers, the protesters dispersed. At the Vijay Institute of Paramedic Sciences in Belagavi, the unrest has led to tensions. Six people who had raised the slogan “Allahu Akbar” in front of the college were arrested.

According to police, many people who were not associated with the college took part in the protest. After identifying them, the police arrested them.

At Chitradurga Women’s PU College, female students staged a protest outside the college. A student complained that he was not allowed to enter his “own college”.

“Are we not students of this college? We have been coming here for five years. The court only issued a temporary order (restricting the use of hijab and saffron scarves). Our only request is that we take off the burqa but we will wear the hijab. If we are not allowed in, we sit outside every day,” the student said.

Another student said they were supposed to take the preparatory exams but due to the ban they were forced to sit in the hot sun.

In Chikkamagaluru, students held a rally and questioned why Hindus were allowed to use their “bindi and bangles religious symbol” if there were any restrictions.

On January 1, six female college students from Udupi attended a press conference organized by Campus Front of India (CFI) in the coastal city to protest against college authorities for refusing them entry to class by wearing the hijab.

This was four days after they asked the principal to grant permission to wear the hijab in class, which was refused.

Until then, students wore hijabs on campus and entered the classroom after removing headscarves, college principal Rudre Gowda said.

“The institution had no rules on wearing the hijab as such and since no one had used to wear it in class for the past 35 years. The students who came with the request had the support outside forces,” Rudre Gowda said. .

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