School of Journalism and New Media professors offer advice to students

A new semester has begun at the University of Mississippi School of Journalism and New Media, and some of our professors are offering the following advice to students:

Graham Bodie

Graham Bodie

Listen to other perspectives. Graham Bodie, Ph.D., a professor of integrated marketing communications, said going to class and asking questions that lead to deeper understanding, especially around issues that are complex and steeped in multiple diverse perspectives.

“Learn to consider two or more seemingly contradictory perspectives as plausible before accepting or rejecting anything out of hand,” he said. “Try to read something or talk to someone who disagrees with you every day.”

Express yourself. Bodie said to speak with passion and confidence about a job you care about and have knowledge and/or experience for, and always listen like you’re wrong.

You could be wrong. “Don’t be surprised when you’re wrong, and don’t treat the evil of others as a weapon to be wielded in a battle over who will win an argument that may not have a single right answer,” he said. declared.

When you’re privileged to be in a position of power, Bodie said, “leverage the diversity of views and perspectives on these large, messy, complex issues you’ve been tasked with, and take risks on solutions that involve collective intelligence”.

Fail. And remember, sometimes we learn by failing.

“Fall out here, when you can do it in a ‘safe’ environment,” he said. “Don’t think of ‘safe’ as an environment that makes you feel comfortable. You should be uncomfortable sometimes.

Emily Bowen Moore

Emily Bowen Moore

Communication is the key. Emily Bowen-Moore, associate professor of integrated marketing communications education, said communicating with instructors.

“It makes all the difference in the world,” she said.

Elizabeth Allen Estes

Elizabeth Allen Estes

Read the instructions. Elizabeth Allison Estes, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Integrated Marketing Communications, shared this post:

“Dear Gen Z student, you are so wonderful in so many ways. But having grown up fully immersed in digital technology, you tend to assume that you can accomplish tasks intuitively. You will save us a lot of extra work and of sadness if you read the instructions FIRST and then follow them. With much love, Professor Gen X.

Lecturer Robin Street discusses a class project with two students from her Public Relations Case Studies course.  From left to right, Major IMC Jessica Lanter, Street and Major IMC Naiomei Young.  Photo by Maddie Bridges.

Robin Street

Save due dates in a calendar. Robin Street, assistant instructor in integrated marketing communications, said her advice was simple, but effective.

“At the start of the semester, bring all your programs together,” she said. “Then get a calendar, either a hard copy or a digital version. Go through each program carefully and highlight each due date. Then, one by one, put all those dates on your main calendar.

“Yes, it will be tedious, but it will help you so much. If due dates change, be sure to go back and change your schedule. »

Write reminders. Street said it’s helpful to jot items down a week or two before the due date.

“Write on your calendar on October 15 that an item is due in two weeks. This way, appointments don’t surprise you.

Work every day. Street’s second piece of advice is to dedicate some time to a big project every day.

“The longer you delay this project, the bigger it gets,” she said. “I do it myself when I have a lot of homework to correct. I spend an hour grading. I don’t rate them all, of course, but it’s progressing. Then, the next day, I devote another hour to it.

Kristen Alley Swain

Kristen Alley Swain

Develop your skills. Kristen Alley Swain, Ph.D., associate professor of journalism, said look for ads for your dream job or jobs. Then make a list of skills and backgrounds that these employers want you to learn while enrolling at UM.

College is the easiest time to do it — because right now you have the resources and the support to do it,” she said. “For example, you can produce content for a nonprofit or campus office, attend events related to your interests to help you network, and volunteer for leadership roles in a student club.

“Use each course to help you build your professional ‘toolkit’ – add skills, perspectives, experiences, knowledge, content, publications and other deliverables that will help you succeed in a job market Demonstrating tenacity, a strong work ethic, effective time management habits, and a willingness to actively participate in every class will go a long way to earning good references and launching a fantastic career.

Stefanie Goodwiller

Stefanie Goodwiller

Talk to your teachers. Media design assistant teacher Stefanie Goodwiller said don’t be afraid to ask questions.

“If you’re not sure about something, ask your teacher before asking your peers,” she said.

Debbie Woodrick Hall

Debbie Woodrick Hall

Define aims. Debbie Woodrick Hall, teaching assistant professor of integrated marketing communications, shared some survival tips for Ole Miss students written by Bonnie Brown.

“So maybe you haven’t answered the question ‘what do you want to be when you grow up,'” Brown said. “The Career Center can help you. But you can set goals for the semester – a certain GPA, some type of behavior modification, establish an exercise routine, actively participate in class. Either way, make it yours and prepare for success! You have this!”

Robert Magee

Robert Magee

Use memory recall. Robert Magee, Ph.D., associate professor of integrated marketing communications, said a good way to prepare for a test is to use a blank sheet of paper.

“Write down everything you remember,” he said. “Then compare it to your notes to see what you missed. Recall memory is much more difficult than recognition memory, so this will give you an idea of ​​how prepared you are.

Define a Concept. “When trying to master a concept, see if you can define it in your own words in no more than two sentences,” Magee said. “If you can’t define it in two sentences or less, then you don’t know what you’re talking about. It is a sign of confused or half-baked thinking. To write well, you must first think well.

Lynette Johnson

Lynette Johnson

Look for opportunities. Lynnette Johnson, Ed.D, said, “Be open to unexpected opportunities as they arise. Walk through that door of opportunity…you never know where it may lead. If you don’t ask, then the answer is already “No”.

Ellen Meacham

Ellen Meacham

To be involved. Ellen Meacham, adjunct assistant professor of journalism education, said attend any panel discussions, guest speakers or free events you can.

“It’s a great opportunity to learn more about the world from people there,” she said. “Never again will you have such a distinguished and knowledgeable sample of experts so easily accessible. You will learn a lot, and it is also a great way to network and network for future internships and jobs.

Mike Tonos

Mike Tonos

Come to class. Mike Tonos, journalism coordinator and teaching associate professor, said: Introduce yourself and get to know your instructor, even if it means a single, short, one-on-one encounter. This applies to all levels, not just in-person classes.

“For all, do the work assigned to you,” he said. “In my classes, you’ll get at least some credit for turning in your homework. The alternative is an automatic zero.

Debora Wenger

Debora Wenger

Remember – everything counts. Debora Wenger, Ph.D., associate dean, said there is no “program day.”

“Seriously, make every class period count and stay on top of the homework,” she said. “It will always be easier to do well on a course if you avoid falling behind.

“Pro tip: Take advantage of every extra credit opportunity – you never know when you’ll need those extra three points.”

Tags: student advice, top imc programs, top journalism programs, featured, imc, integrated marketing communications, journalism, Ole Miss, Oxford, School of Journalism and New Media, University of Mississippi

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