tuition fees – Virginia Marti College http://virginiamarticollege.com/ Mon, 11 Apr 2022 15:35:15 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://virginiamarticollege.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-3-120x120.png tuition fees – Virginia Marti College http://virginiamarticollege.com/ 32 32 Reflections from WT: First Generation University Students https://virginiamarticollege.com/reflections-from-wt-first-generation-university-students/ Sun, 06 Mar 2022 15:00:00 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/reflections-from-wt-first-generation-university-students/ By Walter Wendler Following on from sharing the first four thoughts published in November 2017, here is the second piece I wrote after arriving at WT. In 1769, Charles Thompson received financial aid from the widow of John Hobbs to study ministry at Brown University. In 1792, the Philadelphia Association gave President Brown permission to […]]]>

By Walter Wendler

Following on from sharing the first four thoughts published in November 2017, here is the second piece I wrote after arriving at WT.

In 1769, Charles Thompson received financial aid from the widow of John Hobbs to study ministry at Brown University. In 1792, the Philadelphia Association gave President Brown permission to employ a student to ring the bell. For this, the student earned tuition, fees, room and board. Financial aid and work to pay for education are not new.

Wayland Baptist University, named after Francis Wayland, former president of Brown University and a prominent advocate for the abolition of slavery, began admitting African-American students 70 years ago. Probably, all first generation.

Meeting the needs of first-generation students is important, historic, and increasingly contemporary. The majority of the group are students of color with rapidly growing Hispanic and Latino segments.

Somewhere between a third and a quarter of all current post-secondary students are “first generation”. Definitions vary widely. In all circumstances, the group grows and the success rates plummet. Six-year graduation rates are 40% for first-generation students and 55% for those whose parents are in college.

Money, just like the case in the 1700s, is always an issue. However, integration and a sense of accomplishment are also confusing challenges for many first-generation students. Don’t confuse the focus on first-generation students with an indication that everyone should go to college, because it will make them smarter, happier, and better citizens. Fortunately, this is the case for many, but it is not universal. Military service, trades and technical fields offer good career opportunities and are powerful alternatives for all categories of students, including the first generation.

The idea that borrowing for college at any cost is a good investment is patently false. Scholarship and grant opportunities are essential. Unfortunately, the fastest growing group of alumni in the United States are students in debt who have not completed their bachelor’s degrees, creating contempt and suspicion for teaching. superior. Lenders who undoubtedly fund college loans, students and families who undoubtedly study in fields where employment may be non-existent, and university leaders and legislators who pedal a bill that any college degree is a good investment, no matter what it costs, all mislead students. This is particularly glaring with first-generation college students and their hope-chasing parents.

Ioanna Opidee, in University Business Magazine, outlines a number of considerations that apply equally to first-generation students and all students. UT’s Center for Community College Student Engagement reports that 47 percent of first-generation college students plan to transition to a four-year college. Those who are not the first in the family to attend say they plan to transfer at a 20% higher rate. Responsive universities will diligently seek out community college graduates, especially first-generation students, to complete their bachelor’s degree with little or no debt and a clear sense of future vocation or graduate school.

Universities interested in attracting first-generation students should establish a strong presence in high schools. The dialogue could be a source of insight and wisdom regarding the costs and benefits of a college degree.

Summer programs informing students of the opportunities available to those completing a bachelor’s degree would help clarify and define the aspirations of college students. MIT sponsors a program that allows high school counselors to participate in the admissions process, identifying hard-working and committed students who show a strong propensity to succeed even when they may be the lowest performing applicants and average student. Often, first-generation college students fall into this category.

Living learning communities — dormitories that house students with similar backgrounds and interests — could be beneficial for first-generation students. My own experience as a first generation student allowed for a transfer to Texas A&M University. I was living in Utay Hall, dorm #12, on the Corps Quad. A hundred other transfer students, mostly first-generation, joined me. We were a living learning community, but no one told us. We thought the first task was survival among the cadets. I wasn’t following, and we lost a number of battles, but I think our persistence rate was a win. First-generation college students, as is the case with all college students, do best when they engage in leadership opportunities.

Engaging first-generation students leads to more prosperous state, local, and national economies. According to the American Enterprise Institute and the Institute for Family Studies, strong families are the key to economic prosperity. “The proportion of married parents in a state is one of the strongest predictors of economic outcomes studied in this report. In fact, this family factor is generally a stronger predictor of economic mobility, child poverty and family income median in US states than are the state education, race, and age compositions.

Strong social and mentorship structures – such as families – coupled with appropriate opportunities and balanced aspirations build economic power, an important role for public universities.

Universities should commit to helping first-generation students to be the last branch of the first-generation family tree, if higher education is their aspiration.

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Hawkeye Community College students will pay 1% more next year in tuition and fees | Education News https://virginiamarticollege.com/hawkeye-community-college-students-will-pay-1-more-next-year-in-tuition-and-fees-education-news/ Wed, 23 Feb 2022 14:45:01 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/hawkeye-community-college-students-will-pay-1-more-next-year-in-tuition-and-fees-education-news/ WATERLOO — Students will pay more to attend Hawkeye Community College next fall, but it will be the smallest increase in more than a decade. “This is a very, very modest increase, 1.2%,” Chairman Todd Holcomb told the board on Tuesday. “I propose moving forward with smaller increases in tuition fees. I think it helps […]]]>

WATERLOO — Students will pay more to attend Hawkeye Community College next fall, but it will be the smallest increase in more than a decade.

“This is a very, very modest increase, 1.2%,” Chairman Todd Holcomb told the board on Tuesday. “I propose moving forward with smaller increases in tuition fees. I think it helps us move forward as a college.






Holcomb


Trustees approved a $2.50 increase in tuition and fees per credit hour, bringing the cost to $210 effective July 1. The board also approved a budget of $75.7 million for 2022-23, an increase of $2.46 million from the re-estimated budget for the current fiscal year. Overall property tax revenue is expected to increase by 5.33% under the budget.

Tuition increases by $2 to $204 per credit and there will be a 50 cent increase in activity fees to $6. An in-state student taking 12 credits, a typical full-time load, would pay $2,520 in tuition and fees per term. That’s $30 more than such a student is paying this year.

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Since the fall of 2011, according to Courier records, the lowest previous increase in tuition and fees was 2.72% in 2014-2015. During these years, it increased by 5.64% year-on-year. Current tuition and fees are up 3.23% from last year.







Dan Gillen NEW

Gillen


With students taking just under 100,000 credit hours, vice president of administration and finance Dan Gillen said the $2.50 increase is expected to yield “just over $200,000 in tuition and fees” more than this year.

Holcomb said expected growth in other areas like workforce education will contribute to increased expenses that the small tuition increase may not cover. Administrators will also strive to control costs by consolidating or eliminating positions and budget reserve funds can also be used to fill gaps.

Students who travel from out of state to attend Hawkeye will pay $17 more than Iowa residents, bringing their tuition and fees per credit to $227. The difference between in-state and out-of-state tuition has been shrinking in recent years.

“Since I’ve been president, we’ve actually frozen out-of-state tuition,” Holcomb said, noting that he favors equalizing the rates all students pay. “My goal was to get there slowly.”

Other income

Budget figures assuming stable enrollment levels show estimates of $18.96 million in tuition and $1.31 million in tuition.

The budget also estimates total state funding at $18.36 million, assuming an increase in general assistance that has yet to be set. Federal assistance of $2.13 million is planned.

A total of $13.02 million in alternative property and utility tax recovery is expected for the college’s 10-county service area in the next fiscal year. That’s $659,172 more than was estimated for the year ending June 30.

The tax rate will increase by just under a penny to about $1.19 per $1,000 of assessed value. Administrator Jay Nardini praised the small increase in the tax rate, calling it “rather good that we can keep it this low”.

The growth in real estate appraisals in the 10-county area and the gradual increase in the tax rate are driving the increase in collections.

Hawkeye Community College proposes 5% increase in property tax collection

However, since the state-determined residential reduction used in calculating tax bills includes a lower percentage of residential ownership for next year, the owner of a home that has not increased in value would see a drop in the Hawkeye portion of the annual tax bill.

For a home worth $100,000 in the current and next tax year, the college’s share of the tax bill would drop from $2.18 to $64.18.

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How Inflation Could Affect Student Finances https://virginiamarticollege.com/how-inflation-could-affect-student-finances/ Thu, 10 Feb 2022 00:55:00 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/how-inflation-could-affect-student-finances/ Historic inflation has affected markets across the country, and ASU students could see even higher prices on products, and potentially tuition, as a result. Global supply chain shortages combined with increased demand have driven prices up. Demand for basic goods and other assets has increased as consumers emerge from a pandemic-induced spending slump, according to […]]]>

Historic inflation has affected markets across the country, and ASU students could see even higher prices on products, and potentially tuition, as a result.

Global supply chain shortages combined with increased demand have driven prices up.

Demand for basic goods and other assets has increased as consumers emerge from a pandemic-induced spending slump, according to Daniel Marburger, a clinician in economics. professor at ASU.

“As consumers, we’re bogged down and there’s huge pent-up demand,” Marburger said. “Because all the people who would have bought a house but didn’t, and now they’re all buying at the same time. And that’s true for so many things.”

In December 2020, the national annual inflation rate was 7%, the highest since 1982, according to Trade economy. In the Phoenix area in December, prices for all consumer goods and services rose 9.7% on average over a 12-month period, according to the BLS.

During this period, the price of meat, poultry, fish and eggs increased by 14.5%. Energy prices have seen a sharp increase of 40% over the same period, mainly due to the cost of gasoline, according to the BLS.

Supply chain issues have also contributed to a lack of supply, further driving up prices.

ASU establishes contracts with its suppliers that allow for small price increases in extreme market conditions. So far, none of the University’s suppliers have shown serious financial impacts that could increase University spending, said Jamon Hill, ASU’s assistant vice president of supply chain. , in an email.

However, if the University were to spend more on staff salaries and supplies due to rising inflation, this could have an impact on tuition fees – but ASU would have to prove that its higher expenses justify a tuition increase to the Arizona Board of Regents who have the final say – Marburger said.

“Theoretically, when the University wants to get their tuition approved for the coming year, they could present data to the Board of Trustees saying, ‘Look, our costs have gone up. We’re going to have to raise tuition,” Marburger said.

Historically, tuition fees increase independently of inflation.

Between the 2008-2009 and 2018-2019 academic years, prices for undergraduate tuition, tuition, and room and board at public institutions in the United States increased by about 28%, according to the National Center for Education Statistics, against only a 19% increase. national inflation over the same period.

This year, inflation is not expected to impact ASU tuition, according to University spokesman Chris Fiscus.

For the 2021-22 school year, the Arizona Board of Regents, which approves tuition fees for public universities in Arizona, did not raise tuition fees. Tuition increases at the University have been on hold since 2020, in part due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Fast food prices rose 8% nationally over a 12-month period, according to the BLS. According to a National Restaurant Association survey in September 2021, 75% of restaurant owners said they were understaffed.

According to Marburger, health issues could explain why some restaurants remain understaffed, especially with the highly transmissible omicron variant.

While the University has so far been largely spared from supply shortages, other parts of Arizona, especially rural communities, have felt the pain of international supply chain issues.

Bashas has struggled to stock shelves due to supply shortages and a lack of staff at its Chandler distribution center, affecting all of the company’s stores, according to a statement from Bashas’ president sent to the Navajo Nation.

Labor shortages are partly responsible for the rise in prices. Production costs for employers rise as they raise wages to attract applicants, forcing companies to pass the costs on to the consumer, such as increased menu prices.

Marburger said that although the economic situation is now unpredictable, inflation is likely to subside eventually.

“I’m going to take my foot off the accelerator and then release the brakes. And that’s kind of what the Fed is saying, okay, we’re going to have inflation. We’re not going to put the brakes on because it could trigger a recession, but now we’re going to take our foot off the accelerator and consider putting our foot on the brake,” Marburger said.


Contact the reporter at kryback1@asu.edu and follow @KadenRyback on Twitter.

Like The state press on Facebook and follow @statepress on Twitter.


Continue to support student journalism and make a donation to the state press today.


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Comment: College students are not getting the education they paid for. Where is the refund? | Opinion https://virginiamarticollege.com/comment-college-students-are-not-getting-the-education-they-paid-for-where-is-the-refund-opinion/ Sat, 22 Jan 2022 09:00:00 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/comment-college-students-are-not-getting-the-education-they-paid-for-where-is-the-refund-opinion/ When you buy a product that does not match its description, what do you do? The logical thing to do is to return the product and get your money back. But some things are hard to repay. Tuition is one of them. Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, schools have alternated between in-person and […]]]>

When you buy a product that does not match its description, what do you do? The logical thing to do is to return the product and get your money back. But some things are hard to repay. Tuition is one of them.

Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, schools have alternated between in-person and remote learning. Despite this back and forth between online and in-person education, one thing remains unchanged: cost.

Students pay the price of in-person training for online training. Colleges charge mandatory transportation and campus fees even if the students are not even on campus.

When students paid their tuition for the 2019-2020 school year, they were paying for an academic year of an interactive and immersive on-campus student experience. This is the product we paid for. Halfway through the product lifecycle, schools announced that in-person classes would be suspended.

We spent the remaining half of the school year learning virtually. The product has only served half of its life cycle, but there have been no refunds or refunds. Some schools make exceptions, offering full or partial refunds to students who withdraw before the withdrawal deadline. But most schools do not offer refunds after the fifth week of classes.

Students are once again exploited by colleges. Many students returned to the classroom in person last September.

But after just half a school year of in-person learning, schools are returning to online learning. Some colleges are returning to temporary online instruction.

For example, the University of California, Berkeley begins the semester with a two-step process, with most classes offered entirely remotely for the first two weeks and then shifting entirely in-person. Yet that is not what students pay. And yet, colleges do nothing to make up for those two weeks of wasted campus and transportation fees.

Tuition fees are already expensive. Two-thirds of developed countries offer free or low-cost university to their citizens. The United States is not one of these countries. In the United States, for the 2021-22 academic year, the average cost of tuition and fees for a four-year private college is $38,070. Notably, for public colleges, the cost of attendance varies by residency, but in-state tuition and fees for 2021-22 at public four-year schools averaged $10,740. Out-of-state tuition and fees averaged $27,560. Costs are even higher when considering housing and meals, books and supplies, health insurance, personal expenses, food and transportation.

A large portion of college tuition is spent on academic support, student services, and ancillary businesses. Academic support provides libraries, museums, galleries, computer labs, and other educational materials for students. Student services cover expenses for student organizations, career counselling, student newspapers, and other activities that contribute to student well-being. Ancillary businesses are non-academic staff and services such as dormitories, canteens, football stadiums and swimming pools.

If students attend classes virtually from home, even if only for two weeks, they cannot fully utilize the services they pay for.

A few years ago, top colleges were embroiled in a college admissions bribery scandal. More recently, a number of elite colleges have been accused of limiting financial aid. These incidents cast doubt on the ethics of our higher education system. Schools charge students exorbitant tuition but offer no refunds even when students don’t get what was promised – in-person learning, campus access and, most importantly, support.

Shawn Tran is a recent graduate of the University of California at Berkeley with a degree in public health.

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During the pandemic, students are not getting the education they paid for https://virginiamarticollege.com/during-the-pandemic-students-are-not-getting-the-education-they-paid-for/ Tue, 18 Jan 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/during-the-pandemic-students-are-not-getting-the-education-they-paid-for/ The BDN Opinion section operates independently and does not set newsroom policies or contribute to the writing or editing of articles elsewhere in the newspaper or on bangordailynews.com. Shawn Tran is a recent graduate of the University of California at Berkeley with a degree in public health. He wrote this for the Chicago Tribune. When […]]]>

The BDN Opinion section operates independently and does not set newsroom policies or contribute to the writing or editing of articles elsewhere in the newspaper or on bangordailynews.com.

Shawn Tran is a recent graduate of the University of California at Berkeley with a degree in public health. He wrote this for the Chicago Tribune.

When you buy a product that does not match its description, what do you do? The logical thing to do is to return the product and get your money back. But some things are hard to repay. Tuition is one of them.

Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, schools have alternated between in-person and remote learning. Despite this back and forth between online and in-person education, one thing remains unchanged: cost.

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Tuition-Free College Courses Available – Knox County VillageSoup https://virginiamarticollege.com/tuition-free-college-courses-available-knox-county-villagesoup/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 14:04:16 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/tuition-free-college-courses-available-knox-county-villagesoup/ A new partnership between the Maine Community College System and the Maine Department of Education will provide free college tuition, including online classes, to adult education students in Maine. This new opportunity will allow adult education students to complete a college course with the full support of their adult education program mentors so they can […]]]>

A new partnership between the Maine Community College System and the Maine Department of Education will provide free college tuition, including online classes, to adult education students in Maine. This new opportunity will allow adult education students to complete a college course with the full support of their adult education program mentors so they can develop the habits, skills, and confidence needed to succeed in the workplace. ‘university.

“Maine’s adult education programs have helped thousands of Maine adults make a successful transition to college,” said Maine Education Commissioner Pender Makin. “This new partnership with Maine’s community college system takes it to the next level by giving students the chance to try out a college course with the support they need. We are thrilled to see the impact this is having on our adult education students.

Adult education programs will work with mature students to select a community college course that suits their college and career goals, and then support the student as they complete the course. The aim is for them to continue their studies after completing the course.

“This is an opportunity for us to encourage and connect with mature students throughout Maine,” said MCCS President Dave Daigler. “The hope is that students can choose courses that match their individual career goals and that we can help provide that motivation and support to continue once they complete their adult education program. “

Tuition and fees for the courses will be provided by the Maine Community College System, while the Maine Department of Education’s Office of Adult Education will provide textbooks and course materials to students.

Mature students interested in this program will need to be enrolled in a Maine adult education program to take advantage of this opportunity. Adults (with or without a high school diploma) who want help with their educational and career goals can contact their local adult education program for next steps.

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Maine DOE and MCCS Partner to Offer Free College Courses to Adult Education Students https://virginiamarticollege.com/maine-doe-and-mccs-partner-to-offer-free-college-courses-to-adult-education-students/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 17:51:52 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/maine-doe-and-mccs-partner-to-offer-free-college-courses-to-adult-education-students/ PO-pvaec-36-19 File photo by The Observer / Stuart Hedstrom Penquis Higher Education Center in Dover-Foxcroft. File photo by The Observer / Stuart Hedstrom Penquis Higher Education Center in Dover-Foxcroft. Contributed • January 9, 2022 Maine adults who wish to pursue a college education have a new option to start their education with support from their […]]]>

Maine adults who wish to pursue a college education have a new option to start their education with support from their local Maine Adult Education program. A new partnership between the Maine Community College System and the Maine Department of Education will offer tuition-free college courses to adult education students in Maine.

Maine adults who wish to pursue a college education have a new option to start their education with support from their local Maine Adult Education program. A new partnership between the Maine Community College System and the Maine Department of Education will offer tuition-free college courses to adult education students in Maine.

Maine’s adult education programs have supported mature students in their college transition and career through the Maine College and Career Access program for nearly 20 years. This new opportunity expands on that idea by allowing adult education students to take a college course with the full support of their adult education program mentors so that they can develop the habits, skills and confidence needed to be successful. at University.

“Maine’s adult education programs have helped thousands of Maine adults make a successful transition to college,” said Maine Education Commissioner Pender Makin. “This new partnership with the Maine community college system takes it to the next level by giving students the chance to try a college course with the support they need. We are delighted to see the impact this has on our adult education students. ”

Adult education programs will work with mature students to choose a course at the community college that suits their college and career goals, and then support the student throughout the course. The goal is for them to continue their studies after the course is completed.

“This is an opportunity for us to encourage and bond with mature students across Maine,” said Dave Daigler, President of MCCS. “The hope is that students can choose courses that match their individual career goals and that we can help provide that motivation and support to continue once they have completed their adult education program. “

Tuition and fees for the courses are generously provided by the Maine Community College System, while the Adult Education Office of the Maine Department of Education will provide textbooks and course materials to students.

Mature students interested in this program will need to be enrolled in a Maine adult education program to take advantage of the opportunity. Adults (with or without a high school diploma) who would like to be helped achieve their education and career goals can contact their local adult education program for next steps.

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PRESS RELEASE: Maine DOE and MCCS Partner to Offer Free College Courses to Adult Education Students https://virginiamarticollege.com/press-release-maine-doe-and-mccs-partner-to-offer-free-college-courses-to-adult-education-students/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 20:30:43 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/press-release-maine-doe-and-mccs-partner-to-offer-free-college-courses-to-adult-education-students/ Adults in Maine who wish to pursue a college education have a new option to start their education, with support from their local Maine Adult Education Program. A new partnership between the Maine Community College System (MCCS) and the Maine Department of Education (DOE) will offer free college courses to adult education students in Maine. […]]]>


Adults in Maine who wish to pursue a college education have a new option to start their education, with support from their local Maine Adult Education Program. A new partnership between the Maine Community College System (MCCS) and the Maine Department of Education (DOE) will offer free college courses to adult education students in Maine.

Maine’s adult education programs have supported mature students in their college transition and career through the Maine College and Career Access program for nearly two decades. This new opportunity expands on that idea by allowing adult education students to take a college course with the full support of their adult education program mentors so that they can develop the habits, skills and confidence needed to be successful. at University.

“Maine’s adult education programs have helped thousands of Maine adults make a successful transition to college,” said Maine Education Commissioner Pender Makin. “This new partnership with the Maine community college system takes it to the next level by giving students the chance to try a college course with the support they need. We are delighted to see the impact this has on our adult education students. “

Adult education programs will work with mature students to choose a course at the community college that suits their college and career goals, and then support the student throughout the course. The goal is for them to continue their studies after the course is completed.

“This is an opportunity for us to encourage and bond with mature students across Maine,” said Dave Daigler, President of MCCS. “The hope is that students can choose courses that match their individual career goals and that we can help provide that motivation and support to continue once they have completed their adult education program. “

Tuition and fees for the courses are generously provided by the Maine Community College System, while the Adult Education Office of the Maine Department of Education will provide textbooks and course materials to students.

Mature students interested in this program will need to be enrolled in a Maine adult education program to take advantage of the opportunity. Adults (with or without a high school diploma) who would like assistance in achieving their education and career goals can contact their local adult education program for the next steps.

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Should High School Students Take Advanced College Courses? It is complicated. https://virginiamarticollege.com/should-high-school-students-take-advanced-college-courses-it-is-complicated/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 11:04:22 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/should-high-school-students-take-advanced-college-courses-it-is-complicated/ When Abby Farnan graduated from Columbia High School in East Greenbush in 2020, she had seven university-accredited courses under her belt, including advanced placement psychology and biology, as well as credits from foreign languages. But while her classes are aligned with her career goals – she is now a double major in biology and psychology […]]]>


When Abby Farnan graduated from Columbia High School in East Greenbush in 2020, she had seven university-accredited courses under her belt, including advanced placement psychology and biology, as well as credits from foreign languages.

But while her classes are aligned with her career goals – she is now a double major in biology and psychology at Union College – only one course will count towards her undergraduate degree.

The 19-year-old said she had mixed feelings about the rigorous electives and advanced courses she took in high school, accredited by the University of Albany and Hudson Valley Community College.

“I think overall my access points were worth it,” Farnan said. “They raised my GPA and taught me things that really helped me do very well in my introductory college courses. I was more disappointed that my credits from college to high school. “weren’t transferred… that was boring for sure.”

Advanced Placement (AP), ‘college to high school’ and other dual enrollment programs that allow high school students to earn college credit for a fee have mushroomed in recent years – creating a dizzying array of opportunities. ‘academic options for many students as from the ninth year.

In the State University of New York system alone, high school enrollment has increased 40% over the past 10 years.

In 2002, the possibilities for double registration were almost non-existent. Today, 41,000 high school students represent 25% of all enrollment in community colleges in the state, according to figures from SUNY.

Parents unfamiliar with this new landscape tend to balk at the compulsory tuition and AP exam costs associated with the electives their child pursues in high school.

College admissions experts agree that AP courses are the most valuable on a college admission application and cost less than concurrent enrollment credits provided by local institutions.

“I think no one should be paying for these classes and it looks like the high schools are pushing them,” said Dean Skarlis, president of the New York College Advisor, an Albany-based agency that supports high school kids through college. admission process.

There are doubts about the thoroughness of the non-AP, supposedly college-level courses taught by high school teachers, Skarlis said.


Even when there is an articulation agreement between the accrediting community college and the four-year college or university the student aspires to – the Troy’s Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, for example, recognizes many credits in science from Engineer from Hudson Valley Community College – There is no guarantee that the high level academic credits will directly match any class required by the four-year degree-granting institution, according to Skarlis.

AP courses are nationally recognized and result in 3-5 college credits depending on exam results and college competitiveness. Likewise, International Baccalaureate (IB) courses are recognized by most institutions.

Increasingly, AP courses are accredited by local institutions, which is essentially a source of income for colleges, but is another financial pitfall for students, according to Elizabeth Levine, founder of Signature College Counseling in Beacon.

“When it comes to APs, colleges want to see your AP test scores,” Levine said. “This whole thing of paying for college credit as well is wrong. I always tell my families not to.”

High school college credits are generally offered at a reduced rate by community colleges, as well as some public and private four-year institutions.

Schenectady County Community College, for example, charges high school students $ 64 per credit, a fraction of its price of $ 192 per credit for other part-time students. Financial aid and scholarships are offered on a limited basis and may not cover the full cost of credits.

Concurrent enrollment courses could provide a valuable head start for high school students, especially those who know they will be graduating with a professional degree at community college. However, it won’t necessarily save them money.

Between the Excelsior New York Scholarship and other financial aid resources, SUNYs are technically tuition-free for most full-time students from low-income and middle-class homes, making it more difficult to justification for paying these credits in high school.

However, there are advantages to taking dual enrollment courses aside from the savings in time and money. There is evidence that high school students who take college courses are more likely to attend university and graduate within five years than those who do not.

Advantages are the strongest among students from marginalized backgrounds and first-generation students, but studies show that low-income students and students of color are the least likely to access these courses.

Four-year community college and SUNY credits earned in high school are subject to transfer into the SUNY system, but some private schools will accept them as well.

Dual enrollment courses also allow students who don’t have a clear career goal to explore their interests, according to Kristin Mesick, academic and professional counselor at Colonie Central High School.

“Perhaps more importantly, they provide students with experiences that will help them feel more academically confident when they travel to the college campus of their choice,” said Mesick. Whether the credits are transferred or not, “it’s a victory”.

Colony Central High School currently offers 36 dual-enrolled, college-accredited AP courses, in subjects ranging from the history of art and engineering to introductory sports medicine.

School officials recognize that navigating these course options and determining which ones will be most useful in the future can be a minefield.

To help students make informed decisions, the district is developing a network of graduates who can share their college experiences and advise current Colonie Central students.

According to Levine, the safest bet is to choose advanced courses in major subjects.

Taking university-accredited AP and UAlbany-accredited foreign language classes at Saratoga Springs High School has paid off for the twin daughters of Susan Steer, Tess and Emily. Both will graduate a semester earlier, Emily from Bucknell University in Pennsylvania and Tess from Johns Hopkins University in Maryland.

Tuition fees for both colleges are over $ 55,000 per year, and the family will save tens of thousands of dollars.

“This is proving to be very cost effective, especially for kids who attend private colleges,” Steer said.

Over the years, there has been a lot of talk about increasing access to advanced high school courses, especially for under-represented student populations, but less emphasis has been placed on the quality of these courses.

At SUNY, some changes may be in the works for college courses offered to high school students.

Gov. Kathy Hochul in her Jan. 5 state of state proposed reforming concurrent enrollment programs in the 64-campus public university system. Its 2022 program proposes to encourage high-quality programs that have a proven track record in translating into university credits.

Currently, the grant funding of courses is disconnected from their relative success in helping students advance in college.

“With support tied to success, Governor Hochul will encourage the creation and growth of effective concurrent enrollment programs, and in so doing, will put more and more students on the path to post-secondary graduation.” and the job opportunities that go with it, ”says the governor’s agenda.


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10 Financial Aid Tips For Students Pay for college https://virginiamarticollege.com/10-financial-aid-tips-for-students-pay-for-college/ Mon, 20 Dec 2021 15:08:00 +0000 https://virginiamarticollege.com/10-financial-aid-tips-for-students-pay-for-college/ With the cost of college education rising – tuition and fees at public national universities have jumped 211% over the past 20 years – many students and families are relying on external sources to help pay for their education post-secondary education and seek financial aid advice. (Getty Images) Financial aid falls into two categories: merit-based […]]]>


With the cost of college education rising – tuition and fees at public national universities have jumped 211% over the past 20 years – many students and families are relying on external sources to help pay for their education post-secondary education and seek financial aid advice.

(Getty Images)

Financial aid falls into two categories: merit-based and needs-based.

Universities and colleges distribute merit grants based on academic achievement and talent rather than a family’s family income. Counselors at the University of South Dakota, for example, review ACT scores and high school diplomas during the admissions process to determine eligibility, says Lindsay Miller, interim director of financial aid at school.

The federal government, state governments, and colleges provide assistance as needed in the form of grants, scholarships, co-op, and loans. A student’s level of financial need is determined by the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA. For a smaller number of schools, mainly private colleges, it may also be necessary to complete the CSS profile.

Private scholarships are usually the only source of help that requires additional or separate application, says Shannon Vasconcelos, director of college finance for Bright Horizons College Coach.

The process of figuring out how to pay for college can be daunting and time-consuming, so here are 10 expert financial aid tips.

1. Don’t make assumptions about financial aid eligibility.

Deciding not to apply for financial aid can be a mistake, says Vasconcelos.

“There is a good chance that you are, in fact, eligible,” she adds. “Don’t assume that because your neighbor, who you think has roughly the same amount of money as you, doesn’t qualify, you won’t qualify. You have no idea what’s going on. goes into other people’s household finances. “

2. Do not buy according to the sticker price.

It can be tempting to ignore a college due to the high price tag. But in almost all cases, the sticker price isn’t what a student is actually going to pay, says Melissa Yakabouski, director of undergraduate admissions at the University of Mary Washington in Virginia.

Families should pay attention to the net cost, which is the price of the sticker minus grants and scholarships. This can be determined using the net price calculator on the websites of most colleges.

A student answers questions about household finances, grade point average, test scores, and extracurricular activities. These responses are used to estimate the amount of grants and scholarships a college could award to the student. The financial aid numbers are then subtracted from the total cost of attendance to predict what a family might pay.

3. Avoid paying third parties for scholarship research.

There are many outside scholarships available, including through churches, employers, local businesses, and philanthropic organizations. Miller recommends that a student start looking for scholarships a year before funds are needed.

But she cautions against paying someone to research scholarships and against disclosing personal information such as a social security number. There are free resources to use, including the College Board, FastWeb.com, and the US News Scholarship Finder.

4. Use the IRS data recovery tool.

It can be easy to make a mistake on the FAFSA, but using the Internal Revenue Service’s data recovery tool can reduce filing time and error rates, experts say.

Instead of manual entry, the virtual tool automatically transfers federal tax return information from the IRS to a student’s online FAFSA form.

“Estimating income information or making data entry errors on the FAFSA application can complicate the process when it is time to offer financial aid,” wrote Courtney Henderson, director of the University of Student Financial Center. Oklahoma, in an email.

Those who have filed a US tax return with the IRS are generally eligible to use the tool, but there are exceptions.

5. Be aware of deadlines.

The FAFSA opens every October 1, but the federal deadline to apply is only June 30 of the following year. State and college deadlines may be earlier.

If you miss a deadline, you risk leaving money on the table.

“Typically, forms are submitted once online to all of your colleges that need them,” says Jeff Levy, co-founder of Big J Educational Consulting in California. “What this means is if you submit the FAFSA, say, once to all colleges, you have to submit it before the college with the closest deadline.”

6. Apply early.

Students must not only meet deadlines, but also apply early, as some financial aid is granted on a first come, first served basis. Pay attention to priority deadlines, experts advise.

States such as Alaska, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Nevada, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Carolina, Vermont and Washington have deadlines “as soon as possible after Oct. 1” because “allocations are made until funds are exhausted,” according to the Federal Student Aid Information Center of the Department of Education , or FSAIC.

“Depending on the state you live in this may matter (when you file) as well as the school’s own priority deadlines for the FAFSA and whether they have a separate deadline for the CSS profile,” says Timothy Saulnier , director of financial aid at UMW.

7. Check your emails regularly.

After completing the FAFSA, a student aid report, which includes an expected family contribution to determine financial aid eligibility, is usually sent to the applicant’s email address. Colleges can request additional information by email.

“Make sure you pay attention to your email in order to comply with all requests,” says Vasconcelos.

8. Look at the out-of-pocket expenses.

At first glance, financial aid from one college may seem more important than an offer from another school. But watch out for reimbursable costs.

“You can look at a private school that costs $ 50,000 and they give you $ 30,000 in aid, for example,” Saulnier says. “The direct cost is $ 20,000. And then let’s say the UMW only gives you $ 11,000 but the cost (of attendance) is $ 30,000. The net is $ 19,000, for example. Even if a school gives you a lot more help, it might not necessarily be better financial help. ”

9. A school’s first offer is not always the final offer.

The FAFSA requires “previous” year tax information, which may not reflect the current income or employment status of a student or his parents. If family finances have changed for the worse, a student should alert their college’s financial aid office to explain the changed circumstances and request a financial aid review, known as an appeal.

But changes to financial assistance programs are not limited to specific circumstances. A student with a merit-based scholarship, for example, may try to negotiate a higher offer, Vasconcelos says.

“There is no real downside to doing it,” she adds. “The worst thing they would do is say ‘no’. Families are often surprised at how often they say ‘yes’ and throw away a few thousand dollars more for you.”

10. Contact college financial aid offices with any questions.

Additional details on specific financial aid requirements or deadlines are available on the websites of many colleges. But if the information is still not clear, call or email the financial aid office.

The FSAIC also serves as a resource. Questions about federal assistance can be answered by email, phone, or online chat.

“It’s never too early to consider paying for college,” Miller says. “You absolutely want to educate yourself and be proactive. University admissions counselors will be a great resource to find out about scholarship opportunities, and financial aid offices will be helpful throughout the financial aid process for students.”

Are you trying to finance your studies? Get advice and more in the United States Pay for college center.


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